beeswax



;) Not really all that hung up on ratings. Sounds like a movie I might watch. English humour is classic. Not sure how Andy will feel about that comment... My favorite modern comedy was "Office Space". Kind of like an exaggerated play off lots of real world elements of the folks I deal with at work all the time- If you tell anybody I said that I'll deny everything.

It's come to my attention these days that I'm "catalog deprived". Funny, I've always been aware of them in the environment but just never seemed to aquire them. Got the internet for that. But then you often need to know what you're looking for.

Seems like the only way to preserve some of the really fancy grains would be to put a glass like finish on them. I just tore down a kind of wood plate zylophone kind of thing we scrounged up somewhere years ago. The wife decided she wanted it gone since it's just sat in the corner for a lot of years. I realized the wood slabs that you tapped for tones were some really cool wood. Ebony or somthing really dark and reddish and HARD. Thought I was going to make scales out of them till I got to looking closely. They're cut pretty odd and the only scales of a usable size that could be made would have to be really thin stuff. Beautiful wood grain though. Make a good inlay material...

Had tube of two ton epoxy out in the garage that kind of seeped out all over the place. What a mess. I went and bought some Gorrilla glue. Thought I'd give it a try instead. Much nicer bottling.

I am on the list. Kind of just lurking at present. Not sure I fully understand how it works. I get email conversations in my inbox and have replied and got responces but I feel like I'm missing part of the picture.

Hmm. Could be. I use a lot of the black stuff they sell in the automotive stores 'cause thats the only thing I could find in the really fine grit around here for metal. :-) Just got a set of EDM stones from McMaster-Carr though (up to 600 grit). Can't wait to try them out.

Got a big roll of 1" wide red AlO that I use for all my first pass sanding and oxidation removal. Also a roll of the black mesh stuff that is a little finer. I try to stick with the tan wood sanding paper for handle material.

Don't think I have anything that is true Emery.

Thats pretty much what I've been doing. Most of the handle shaping is done in place on the knife. Don't have to glue it but with the pins holding it snug together I get a better feel for what I'm doing and can pull it apart to do trickier stuff.

The first is what I wanted to do and the second is what happened :/

Have to try and locate one of those...

Don't know about the skilled part but yeah, thats me ;) ... to greater or lesser degrees at times. I figure in the end you get what you get and try to do better the next time.

Not so worried about color matching (within reason) but I'm shooting for a tight fusion anyway. The bolsters in this case are not as seamless as I wanted but it's all holding tight. Kind of limited in material matching by what was available. Pins are my usual brazing rod and the bolster material started out life as a grease bearing. Maleable and brass looking.

Up to now I never really felt the need for one. Got a christmas present that I won't get to play with till after (you guessed it) Christmas ;-) It's a Craftsman All-in-One rotary thing that can operate as a plunge router, angle grinder and hand held cutter/grinder type thing (with the attachments). Should work well for doing more precise drilling among other things.

;-) So there really is some truth to the McGiver slanders.

I'm not adverse to using whatever tools come to hand, but in my limited space (and budget) I don't need a lot of large shop tools getting in the way. Pretty satisfied with my blade crafting capabilities but it's the Fit and Finish stuff that kills me. Would like one of them fancy bench grinders made especially for hollow grinding knives... ;) But as they say, its the skills that need to be developed, not the tools.
GA
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So, Andy, Don't leave me hanging ;) What's a french polish? Do I need to be french to do it? Cool sword display by the way. Do you ever make your own?
GA
wrote:

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On Fri, 10 Dec 2004 04:34:37 -0800, "Greyangel"
Shellac is an ingredient. French polishing is a technique. All french polish uses shellac, not everything done with shellac is a french polish.
French polish has several techniques, but the core of it is the application of a great many, very thin coats of shellac, rubbed out between coats. Generally it's applied with a "rubber", a cloth pad, rather than a brush. Because the surface is built up from so many thin coats, you get a very high sheen and good clarity to the timber beneath.
For the rest of it, read Flexner's book (probably the best all-around woodfinishing introduction) or George Frank's (probably the best on french polishing).

Display ! That's the ready-use rack. The display-only swords are on the other wall. Those two are remounts for iaido, because I wanted a katana with a real handle to it, not just a short one (I normally use one of my WW2 shin gunto). I haven't used them in those mounts yet as I still haven't done the handle wraps.

Years ago I (badly) forge welded a Norse pattern welded sword. I don't really do much smithing. Most of the metalworking I do is cut-weld-grind in sheet or tube to make furniture, but these days I mainly do wood.
--
Smert' spamionam

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wrote:

Thanks for the info. I rather suspected that was the case. I'll have to try it some time. Having observed that Danish oil didn't seem to go in too deep or create a very hard layer I had just recently soaked some handle material in it. Turned out to be a bad idea. It soaked in alright but is still weeping after several days. Thought I'd try baking it in the toaster oven and then decided I'd better check the warnings on the lable. That was a better idea to a REALLY bad idea. Harmful vapors, Rags spontaneously combust (looking sideways at the rag I used to wipe up a spill on my bench), cancer causing agents. I think I'm going to use other things in the future. Heard it was good stuff but I'm not impressed.

Sorry, wasn't implying anything ;-) I've got a co-worker who wants to be a collector and has one authentic piece. He keeps telling me I should buy one and I keep telling him I'd rather make it. Don't really have a use for one beyond display purposes. I'll keep one or two around the house to hang on the wall and maybe have handy in the unlikely odds my house gets picked for a home invasion, but once made, they'll probably end up as gifts like the knives I've made to date (or sell for more tools and supplies). Not good or experienced enough yet to consider actually marketing them. Lots of fun to do though.

I'd like to do forge welding at some point. First I want to make some Mokume to use for fittings and such. The best thing about the hobby is that it opens up a lot of avenues for crafting in general. My daughter wanted a loop to make a Dream Catcher - I said "I can do that!" and had it nocked out in stainless steel in nothing flat ;)
GA
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On Tue, 7 Dec 2004 19:10:50 -0800, "Greyangel"

Carnauba (sp?) wax. The more you buff it the more it shines.
However it is slippery. There's a reason for those tsuka ito and same handles on classic katanas and you'll notice that bokken usually aren't highly polished (at least not in Japan).
--RC

Projects expand to fill the clamps available -- plus 20 percent
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Andy Dingley wrote:

Not a squeeze tube, more of a stick - like a chapstick that pushes up. And yes, you can get "pure" bees wax in this form.
mark h
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I just bought about 8#'s for $2.75 a #. Dark and dirty still had some dead bees in it. Got it at a place called "Betterbee" in Greenwich NY (Upstate). I don't know if they have a web site or not.
enjoy
Andrew

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Just picked up a bottle of stuff from the local hardware store that is a mixture of beeswax and Carnauba (and other things). Haven't had a chance to try it yet but it sounded promising.
GA

about
asking
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me wrote:

Maybe a local beekeeper :-) They have to strip the hives from time to time. They also sell wax as well as honey. If you don't know a beekeeper, the local AG rep for the county does or a local farm that uses them from time to time.
Martin
--
Martin Eastburn, Barbara Eastburn
@ home at Lion's Lair with our computer snipped-for-privacy@pacbell.net
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    Greetings and Salutations....
On Wed, 08 Dec 2004 04:41:02 GMT, "Martin H. Eastburn"

    And if all else fails...go to your plumbing supply/home improvement store and pick up a wax toilet ring. It is the ring that seals a toilet to the drain pipe, and, is still made of beeswax. It is also dirt cheap.     Regards     Dave Mundt
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<snippage>
Ha! Whodathunkit? I've dealt with those. Yeah lots of material for dirt cheap. Sure its the straight stuff? It's pretty soft and sticky.
GA
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