forging non galvanised pipe

i was wondering if any of you have experience at this or any good tooling tips? by the way, i remember several years ago one of our
experienced smiths was burning off the zinc coating in his forge, filled his shop with smoke, felt ill, went to the hospital, and DIED a weak later. it's never a good idea to put any metal that has been plated or coated in your forge. have fun, mark
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Zinc flu is the mild form of zinc poisoning that's bad enough, and you can get this from a whiff og zinc, it's very sad what happened to him, but he should have known better.
Regards Charles
Mark Finn wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Mark Finn) wrote:

For forging pipe which isn't galvanized? I don't get what you are asking. What are you trying to make from the pipe?

Well, cooking zinc in a forge really isn't so bad. It's breathing the fumes you want to avoid. :)
Yeah, it's best to just stay away from the stuff. There's plenty of affordable safe pipe around to work with.
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Curt Welch wrote:

And keep away from the end when your quenching - a face full of steam + zinc fumes isn't fun
--
bigegg

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fullering pipe down is easy enough. stretching over the horn is also a simple task. rolling the end over so that the pipe resembles a lily flower is easily done. what i was hoping to learn would be an easy way to do a long taper. say reduce 1 1/2 " pipe over a 4 or 5 foot length to 3/4 " have fun, mark
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Mark Finn) wrote:

Smashing it down to a flat pipe is easy as well. That's well within my skill range!

That sounds like a fun thing to try. One more forging project for the list.
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I was just discussing this with another smith a few days ago, we thought that cutting a long V shaped notch in the pipe and then forging it closed would yield a reasonable taper.
let us know what you end up doing
Andrew

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i think your on the right track. only instead of cutting a straight grove, cut a spiral. then rather than hammering it closed, just twist it closed. have fun, mark
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Just for fun, I forged a cone on the end of a pipe today. It was a short taper of about 3" on a piece of standard schedule 40 black pipe with an ID of 1 5/8" (don't know what the nominal pipe size is - 1 1/2" maybe)?
Pictures of the result can be seen here:
http://picasaweb.google.com/Curt.Welch/20100324ForgedConeFromSch40Pipe #
There was nothing special or hard about doing it. Just heated it up and hammered never letting the end get too far from round. I forge welded the end closed.
For thick wall pipe like that, I would never bother to try and slit it to make a taper, though a power hammer would be highly useful if attempting a 4 or 5 foot taper. Unless you needed some high accuracy, I don't see any problem at all making the 4 ft taper down to 3/4". Just tapper the end down to 3/4 and then work the taper back until you had the length needed.
I'm going to turn the cone into a circle bending jig. Not sure how well such a short cone will work for that, but I'm about to find out...
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I did heat and bend pipe, it was very easy.
i
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On Mar 11, 9:30pm, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Mark Finn) wrote:

Yeah, guys! You really need to be careful out there. What a sad story. If you mess with that stuff use a powerful fan, a very powerful gas mask, and a super duper powerful vent hooked up to your studio with one fan forcing air into the studio and one out BUT BUT BUT BUT BUT BUT the outgoing air has to go way the heck faaaaaaaaaaaaaar away from the air entry point of the studio. There has been a case where an entire class died by not having a tall exit point like a chimney when the air was not blowing down. If you have a vertical dilemma, simply be sure you only work when the air is going in the direction that blows the air from the exit point of the studios' air AWAY AWAY AWAY AWAY from the entry point of the studios air via vent. To be on the safe side, though, do stay completely away from this type of metal and stick to Fe (IRON). Drool=Iron! Feel free to send as many questions about blacksmithing to me, I studied it in college and know a thing or two that may help. Same, as I'm witnessing for the others in the group. Wish me luck with my machines, reliable renewable energy producing fully-functional sculptures. Constructive critism is always appreciated!
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