My latest work

And last untill the weather lets me set up my fair weather forge again.
The steel for all blades is 1095. After quench they spent a night in
the freezer as cold treatment before tempering (50 min at 400 F then 40
min at 420). The fixed blades then were stuck edge into wet sand and a
torch was used to differential temper the spine (to the neighborhood of
blue).
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slip joint is dress in bocote and brass and has a home in my
pocket. The pins are stainless. The finish is melted beeswax. This is
the second slip joint i've made.
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one is handled in black walnut with brass pins and also finish with
melted beeswax.
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one is handled in maple with brass pins and is finishe with linseed
oil. The spine is a touch larger than 1/16" and almost has enough flex
to be a filet knife. The finger groove is forged in.
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we see a knife all decked out in black walnut with brass
accessories. The finish is linseed oil. One noticable flaw is a pin in
the bolster that didn't quite get peened enough.
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one is purple heart and brass. It looks good. I gave it to a
college buddy to eval for me. It is also finished with linseed oil.
I think I've come a long way since my first few.
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Let me know what you think
Reply to
r payne
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Did Scagel make any folders? If so, do they look something like that? :) What's different? If not, what do you suppose -would be- different? Anyone?
I really like 11, 12 and especially 13.
Funny being on the other side of a flaw like the pin in 13. :) It just plain doesn't matter to me! :) It would otherwise. :/ No kidding. I'm actually kind-of liking it or something? I'm getting a wierd-feeling from this pin... A feeling of confidense or a new feeling of self-empowerment even?
Was the pin too short to start with tho? :/
I've been checking that out a little closer lately... and so far have decided on... 2/3 to 3/4 the diameter of the rod sticking out on both sides as being... not too short and not too long.
YMMV!
Or like you said, you just didn't hammer it enough to fill the hole all the way, even tho you had plenty of pin material?
BTW, BTDT, both ways, on the same handle even. ;)
Cool. :)
But you're "style" is still coming through. Believe it, Ron? :) You got a style ...and it shows? :)
Alvin in AZ
Reply to
alvinj
Scagel did make some folders. Have only seen pics but none looked like that. From memory, all of the ones I have seen had bolsterless, stag handles with an Indian arrow head shield. Nail nick was a slot cut through the blade. A bloke on knifeforums makes quality replicas. Dave shirley, I think.
If this was a perfect world, we, probably, wouldn't be in it.
Reply to
brian w edginton
snip
to me it's a flaw, a mistake I made. The best I can hope for is to learn something from it and maybe cover it up someway.
I've been leaving around 1/2 the diameter on the handles. That gives enough to make the pin tight without much risk of splitting the wood. On this one, I use a pair of pliers to pull on pin when I was test fitting. Before I brought the bolster down flush with the handle that gap wasn't there. I think I still had some pin sticking up and if I'd known it wasn't flush below the surface i could have hit it some more.
Me?? Style???? Now if I could only get a life. :) I just do what the hammer and anvil tell me to, so I guess it's the style of my personal muse.
ron
Reply to
r payne
PS Alvin I've got the picts of the innerds for the slip joint. An image is heading your way. PPS If yall are interested in seeing the parts before assembly, I think we can get a link posted if Alvin wants to host it.
Reply to
r payne
don't like forging below freezing? it's a surefire way to keep you banging away...:)
did you hammer all those blades or grind?
this one pushes all my buttons. i'd buy it in a heartbeat and cherish it every time i used it.
nice work, good craft. keep it up, and hell, if you get tired of that knife, let me know. i'd give up some treasure for it.
carl
Reply to
caterbro
wrote
yeah- fair number of them survive.
The scales are stag; big silver arrowhead escutcheon- he even made some fixed blade knives with folders in the hilt. The blades are pretty much what you'd expect- flat ground, distal tapered, deep nail nick, working shapes.
Chas
Reply to
Chas
I don't mind working outside in the weather, but when the anvil is cold it sucks the heat out of the piece I'm working on way too fast.
Everything was forged as close to shape as I could manage.
Accually I'm wanting to get a sheath to carry that one for a while myself. Glad to hear there are people out there who like my work though.
ron
Reply to
r payne
Why go up for the second temperature?
I like the blade drop for the cutting ability which is similar to a recurve without the sharpening problems.
Reply to
Cliff Stamp
Can't give any good reason. I mostly muddle along at this stage in the game. I was just doing the one temper and start reading on some of the knife forums of people doing multiple tempers so gave it a try. If anyone who knows better cares to enlighten me, I'll change. In fact I'm planning on trying some at 325 F since I've run across a graph (I think from Alvin) showing a peak in strenght there.
ron
Reply to
r payne
This is usually the same temperature or slightly lower, some argue that the same temperature repeated does nothing but others advocate it. There is a lot of contradiction in the various books, often because some things are too simplified and various steels have exceptions.
Reply to
Cliff Stamp

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