Padlock making workshop

Tom Latane', blacksmith extraordinaire, from Pepin, Wisconsin recently put on a padlock making workshop at the Tunnel Mill School south east of
Stewartville, MN. I had a chance to attend. It was a great workshop! The 8 students each made a 16th/17th century padlock in this 3 day workshop. The most modern tool we used was a simple drill press. All other parts were hand forged, chiseled, punched and filed. There were 16 individual parts to be made for the lock. Tom provided partially completed key blanks for us because they are very time consuming to make from scratch. Other than the key blank, the whole lock was made from scratch, using 3/8" round stock, a couple of sizes of flat stock and a piece of band saw blade. We each received a 3 ring binder with good instructions and drawings. We learned a lot about filing and fitting, too. Tom also talked about padlocks in general, focusing on the various "defensive" measures that go into lock design. My lock is basically done, but I have decided not to rivet the case shut. That way I can dismantle it to show how it works. My 4 year old grand daughter loves to take it apart and reassemble it, too! John and Carol Adams, the proprietors of the school have convinced Tom to put on a similar workshop in March of 2006. They are still working on a topic. No matter what the focus of that next workshop will be, I certianly plan to register.
If anybody is interested in some pictures of my lock, they can email me off list and I will upload a couple of them to my website for you to look at.
Pete Stanaitis
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<snip>
Cool. :)

Heck, just post the url here when you get 'em up and going. :)
Alvin in AZ
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Tom Latane' will be the demonstrator at the Feb 2006 conference, at B.R. Amon & Sons Inc., W2950 Hwy 11, Elkhorn, WI 53121.
. More info should be online in the coming weeks at www.umbaonline.org
extraordinaire, from Pepin, Wisconsin recently

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www.spaco.org/padlock.htm
For what it's worth, I also added a "my shop" page. So far it only talks about the shop building, not what's in it. I did this because many guys on rec.crafts.metalworking write in asking about heat, rust, electricity, floors, etc.. It's at: www.spaco.org/myshop.htm
If the mystery poster (781) to this site would ever post HIS SHOP, you would ALL be amazed!!!!
Pete Stanaitis
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"spaco" wrote in message www.spaco.org/padlock.htm
Too cool!! I would love to learn to make a lock like that. I could make a killing selling to the local Renaissance community.
Rodney
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Hi Pete, My name is Steve...I was wondering if you would be willing to scan the pages of the binder that you got. I am a renaissance blacksmith and have made a lock in the past but the one you made seems both simpler and more refined than what I came up with.
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What an awesome skill.. I would love to be able to make a lock... I think I would even consider travelling there to be part of the class.
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Years ago when I went back to visit some friends in my home town in Indiana, one of my friends was really proud to show me the Viking padlock he had made. It was based on artifacts dug up all over northern Europe. The problem was that the Key could get jammed inside the lock if you put it in the wrong way. It did this while I was examining it. I took the lock to another friends shop and figured out how to make a lock-pick set for it to not only allow the key to be removed, but also to bypass the key. I gave the lock back to him the next day with the "viking lock-picks".
--
"I love deadlines, especially the wooshing sound they make as
they fly by" - Douglas Adams
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I'd love to see them - can you post them in the metal working drop box ? http://www.metalworking.com/ then others can see. click on the 'using' button - and you can see it is easy as e-mail - just prep. It might help yourself later. Tons of metal there in the dropbox files - check it out.
Thanks, Martin [ keeper of a 'new' old brass one that might have to be examined. ]
Martin Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH & Endowment Member NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder
spaco wrote:

-
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I'm curious -- what makes the key blanks so time consuming? I'd think the lock itself would take a lot more time. How does one make a a key?
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Good question!
Was it clear in the pictures that this key has a hole in the end of the stem that must fit over a 1/4" round pin centered in the keyhole?
Start your watch running---- Light up forge. (Remember, you have never made a key like this before) These blanks were made from 3/8" X 3/4" stock. Most of the piece is fullered to 3/8" square, leaving the ends full size for the bow and bit. Then the ends are worked as needed to form both bow and bit. This is small and exacting work. A special closed swage is used to rough out the shape of the stem between the bow and the bit. Another special swage is used to shape the bit. Spread the bow. File to clean up the stem to the fancy shape you see in the pix. Carefully center punch the end of the stem and drill a well-centered 1/4" hole about 1" deep. Stop your watch.
Note: This is one of the simpler, smaller keys that I have seen Tom Make. Sometimes he spends hours just decorating them. Since I wrote this original thread, an article about Tom Latane' and his shop appeared in the newsletter of the Guild of Metalsmiths (The Metalsmith). In it, the article's author, Bob Walsh, characterizes Tom as "the finest Art/Locksmith in America".
Now, most of the people at our workshop were pretty fair blacksmiths and none of us got all the way done either. Tom told us that some of the folks that come to some of his classes are a lot short of basic skills, too. Some of them spent a day or more on the key.
A friend of mine was once asked (by Tom Latane') "how much work can students get done in a day?" The friend (Bob Walsh, professional blacksmith) said "What you can do in an hour will take a day of class time." In my experience, that's a good rule of thumb. End of story.
Feel free to email me if you want more--- Pete Stanaitis
snipped-for-privacy@rgs.uci.edu wrote:

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For any one interested, I found pictures of tools Tom Latane made, some of which it looks like would be good for making keys.
http://tinyurl.com/arslt
http://www.metalsmith.org/edu/equipment/tooling/tooling-meeting.htm
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