Propane cylinders and valves

I'm planning to build a gas forge and have been looking into buying or leasing a couple of forklift-size propane cylinders. The guy I spoke
with at the local propane dealer said that those come in two flavors. One has a valve for providing the propane in liquid form (this is the type that's actually used on forklifts, according to him); the other has a valve to provide propane as a gas (he doesn't carry these). I assume I need the gas version for a forge. Is that correct? Have others run into problems finding cylinders with the appropriate type of valve? Do most people here use the forklift size cylinders, or is there a better option?
Thanks. Bert
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True
False
You don't want liquid propane. No-one wants liquid propane, it's a damn nuisance. But if you take a standard cylinder and lay it down horizontally, like it's mounted on most forklifts, then you'll get liquid coming out until the tank is half empty. So forklift tanks have a tube inside, to reach up into the ullage space and deliver dry gas.
You will use the standard sort, and you'll keep them standing upright and preferably chained upright. Get a couple, so you have a spare on hand. Most dealers will only refill their own brand, so be careful who's you get. You can buy abandoned cylinders cheaply from council rubbish dumps, much more cheaply than paying the deposit on a new contract.
Liquid propane carryover will kill you.
PS - I'm in the UK. Local variations may apply.
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Thanks for the explanation, Andy. I'm in the US, but your explanation sounds consistent with some other comments the propane dealer said. If I understand you correctly, I *could* use the valve-with-tube variety as long as it's oriented horizontally, but the better option would be to use the valve-without-tube variety oriented vertically (upright). Is that right? Or should I avoid the former variety altogether?
Bert
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Technically, yes. But it's hard to get these refilled and the deposits are expensive. Better to use the commonplace sort.
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Don't even consider the forklift type. Go for the style that you see in the barbeque setups. As for finding used ones in the dump, here in the USA they would be the old style, before "OPD" and no one will fill them anyway. In this country, anybody I know will fill or trade any "brand" of propane cylinder. Not the same with acetylene,etc.. I would get at least a 40 pound tank or two if you can afford them. I have been using 20 pound tanks for years and they work okay, but freeze up if you use them hard, so I stand them in a pan of water.
Pete Stanaitis -------------------
Bert wrote:

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Why not?
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They will melt!
And cost a lot more.
Martin Martin Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH & Endowment Member NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder
Bert wrote:

-
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On Wed, 08 Mar 2006 10:03:58 -0600, spaco > wrote:

Once you get above a certain size the "old style" is still legal to fill. We use them where I work, as tall as a full sized welding gas cylinder and about twice as large in diameter. (Heavy sons of ...!) All still have the old style valves with no second set of external threads.
--
William


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That's right. Over 40 pounds and no problem. Sorry, I should have mentioned that.
Pete Stanaitis --------------------
William Bagwell wrote:

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If you're not set on forklift-size propane containers, I'd suggest using standard BBQ/Grill cylinders. In California you can buy them for about $20 each if you shop around (CostCo has the best prices I've found). It's about $10--$12 to refill one around here, if you stay away from the Blue Rhino stand.
Another benefit is that they're lighter -- you don't put as much strain on your back hauling them around when full.
One drawback is that you will most likely need to manifold two or more together. When it's cold out they tend to freeze up easily. Still, hooking two together is not too expensive and can be done with parts from the local Home Depot.
If any one is interested, I'll take some pictures of my forge and tanks and post them.
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In California you can buy them for about $20 each if you shop around (CostCo has the best prices I've found). It's about $10--$12 to refill one around here, if you stay away from the Blue Rhino stand. <snip> If any one is interested, I'll take some pictures of my forge and tanks and post them.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Wow, something cheaper in CA than in KS. 20# tank around here will run you $50 and most places charge $15-$18 to fill one.
would love to see pics of your set-up. I am thinking of setting up a gas forge to compliment my coal (still in works to be built) forge.
Rodney
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Pictures are always good. :)
Where are you going to "post" them tho'?
Just pictures of the equipment, none with your face in them, we don't want to be grossed-out, ok? :/ (many of us get on the internet while we're eating, see?;)
Alvin in AZ (second uglyiest guy on rec.knives)
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