WTB gas micro foundry for silvercasting

All,
Does anyone have a propane or MAPP fueled minature gas forge they would be willing to sell me? I am a novice silvercaster and want to start very small at heating 1 to 10 troy ounce melts in a crucible. Needs to be either new or in excellent condition, tested and known to be safely working, I'll also accept bids from proven amateurs. Coffee-can size would be ideal, Hobby-Boy or Poor Boy would be next choice.
Thanks,
The Eternal Squire
Reply to
The Eternal Squire
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All,
Does anyone have a propane or MAPP fueled minature gas forge they would be willing to sell me? I am a novice silvercaster and want to start very small at heating 1 to 10 troy ounce melts in a crucible. Needs to be either new or in excellent condition, tested and known to be safely working, I'll also accept bids from proven amateurs. Coffee-can size would be ideal, Hobby-Boy or Poor Boy would be next choice.
Thanks,
The Eternal Squire
Reply to
The Eternal Squire
All,
Is there someone one there who is leaving the casting hobby who wants
to sell me thier coffee-can forge or foundry? Or is there someone with
experience with creating and using one safely that I can buy from. My
wife WILL NOT PERMIT me to build my own... she rightly believes that 15
years experience as a software designer does not qualify me for design
of highly hazardous equipment.
Thanks in advance,
The Eternal Squire
Reply to
The Eternal Squire
You could have mine, but they are quite brittle after being heated, and likely to be damaged in shipping. Like those cookies your mom used to send you at camp, you'd receive a box of crumbs.
I curious why your wife would think that you're not to be trusted to make your own foundry, but you could safely be ladling molten metal?
Reply to
Richard J Kinch
TES:
You may want to do some reading on how jewelry is/was cast by artists.
The book I have on the subject, somewhat dated I admit, shows that the requisite amount of metal is heated in a tiny crucible which is part of a small centrifugal casting machine, with a reducing (excess fuel) oxy-acetylene flame, and the centrifugal caster triggered once the metal is molten. The crucible is a replaceable component and may even be carved from a block of dense charcoal.
The entire apparatus is surrounded by a round washtub-like affair which would protect you and the environment in case things become adrift.
Generally the amount of molten metal is small, just a little more than required to fill the mold. Unless, of course, you wish to produce life-sized bronzes!
It may be worthwhile for you to join a local art group that is into this type of metalworking, which is best learned by actual observation and doing.
If this is not possible then do your work in a reasonably fire-resistant area with buckets of sand available to douse things as necessary. Working with molten metal is safest in a sand-box like work area because it is fire resistant and spills do not spread out into inaccessible areas.
Nonetheless, joining a "casting club" would be the safest and fastest way to gain first-hand experience.
Trust this helps a little.
Wolfgang
The Eternal Squire wrote:
Reply to
wfhabicher
TES,
See if you can lay your hands on a book entitled "CREATIVE CASTING" bY Charr Choate, library of congress # 66-26172. It is out-of-print more than likely.....I got my copy in 1969!
Marvellous book with how-to instructions, colour photos, and tools & equipment listings.
It states and illustrates, for example, that jewelry items are typically cast in a small centrifugal casting machine, and that the crucible, which may be charcoal, is heated with the reducing flame of an oxy-acetylene torch until the metal is molten. Manually tripping the casting machine gets the centripetal force to inject the molten metal into the mold.
Furnaces and separate crucibles are not required for small stuff.
Now, if you wish to make life-sized bronzes, of your wife for example, THAT is a horse of a different colour!
But, it's best to start small.
Ideally you might join an art group that's into this sort of thing. It is hard to beat direct observation and hands-on experience.
Where are you located?
Regards,
Wolfgang
The Eternal Squire wrote:
Reply to
wfhabicher
Sounds to me like the right thing to do is buy a furnace intended for jewelery work.
Steve
The Eternal Squire wrote:
Reply to
Steve Smith
This really does not compute very well from my view.
If you are not to be considered capable of making something as simple as a coffee can furnace, there's NO WAY you should be considering playing with any molten metal.
Now for the good news.
Root around online for such searches as bean can forge or micro forge. It really can be as simple as carving a couple soft firebricks to create a hollow space, and making a hole for a propane or MAPP gas torch nozzle to fit through. Same for a coffee can forge. Punch a hole through the side of the can, wrap a layer or two of ceramic wool insulation around the inside and stab a hole through the insulation. Look hard at the various commercial torches out there. I have seen guys forge weld in a hollowed out single firebrick forge heated with a plumbers MAPP gas torch, there are bigger air-propane torches out there as well as air-acetylene and oxy acetylene units. A rosebud type torch will give you LOTS of heat.
Look at the burner websites (DAGS "mini mongo burner" and "mongo burner") Not complicated, and less of a risk than holding a crucible of melted metal.
Cheers Trevor Jones
Reply to
Trevor Jones
How much metal are you planning to cast? And it what kind of molds? Reason I ask is, for jewelry / trinket sized objects, you don't need a furnace, and in fact you don't want one. Torch melting with a reducing flame protects the metal from oxidation.
You can melt up to several ounces of silver or gold in a handled crucible with a torch. You might get some firebricks to make a fire-proof work surface, as well. Buy the crucibles and handle from any jewelry supplies outfit.
Go out and buy a copy of "Practical Casting" by Tim McReight, for most of what you need to know to begin. If you don't already own it, buy a copy of "The Practical Metalsmith" while you are at it. With these two books, you can start.
For a torch, you could use anything from a hardware store Mapp gas torch on up to oxy-acetylene. I do most of my casting with an air/acetylene plumbers torch. If you are going to do much silver fabrication, it's worth investing in a good oxy/propane set with a jeweler's torch like the Hoke or Meco Midget. These can also be used for melting up to a few ounces of silver at a time. If you are doing bigger projects than you can easily handle with torch melting, consider a hand-held electric melting furnace, such as the ElectroMelt, which are available in sizes up to about 30 ounces of gold.
The Eternal Squire wrote:
Reply to
Bob
I took a class with Tim, and something didn't look quite right about that spelling, but I had to look it up to be sure. It's Tim McCreight. I think the second book you mentioned is actually "Complete Metalsmith." Tim is an exceptional teacher, and a good guy to boot.
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Ned Simmons
Reply to
Ned Simmons
Of course, you are correct, it's "The Complete Metalsmith". Momentary brain fart, what can I say! LOL.
I would have loved to take a class from him.
Bob
Ned Simm> > >
Reply to
Bob
If you liked that, take a look at "Jewelry: Fundamentals of Metalsmithing" too
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Lots more pictures of people's work and more focus on design. If you're thinking of things to make that are achievable by a jewellery beginner and aren't as plain and simple as the "take a lump, stick a stone in it" school, then this book is great. Oppi Untracht's designs are intimidating, these are approachable.
Reply to
dingbat
Don't think so. Most people who post are not willing to admit they are idiots. I'm difference is... I'm quite happy to admit that I am an idiot.
The Eternal Squire
Reply to
The Eternal Squire

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