What is a 200 lb anvil worth has ACME name on it?

What is a 200 lb anvil worth has ACME name on it? Good condition. Thinking about selling to buy another more transportable.

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Imprint of the Road Runner on the bottom ? :-)
Martin Beep-Beep
CPardue wrote:

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I'd say that the condition, as long as it's a steel anvil and not cast iron would be more important to know about than the name unless you run across somebody who is collecting ACME anvils. If the face and horn are in really great condition, it might fetch $3 to $4 per pound. If it's useable, $2 to $3 per pound. These days you are competing with many companies selling new anvils. Check around.
Pete Stanaitis
CPardue wrote:

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ACME in "Sears" talk = a Hay-Budden anvil.
Although Hay-Budden made anvils for many companies which were sold under the "Hay-Budden" name Sears decided to have their anvils use the name "Acme."
From just before the turn of the century the anvils were made by adding a steel plate to the wrought iron body. But around 1908 Hay-Budden/Acme anvils were made with the entire top above the "waist" out of tool steel.
It seems you have a nice anvil available to trade for just about any lighter anvil (assuming conditions are similar). Good luck.
dennis in nca
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