How do you store your raw stock?



1.5x1.5 stock, at those lengths, are not particularly strong, when one starts putting MANY hundreds of pounds on it. Id suggest a simple diagnol brace from the main upright to the front or middle of each arm. The middle would probably be ok, if the brace is at a 45'ish angle. It wont interfer with his loading them up and it may keep him alive and undamaged.
Did I mention I work in factories all over So. Cal, and have seen stock racks, home made ones, collapse like the World Trade Center?
But hey...I was only making observations. Take em or leave em. Shrug
And yes..you can overload anything. Sometimes however..its harder to do when its properly braced or made of the proper materials. Shrug again.
Gunner, Owner Coyote Engineering
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or about Tue, 11 Aug 2009 11:31:13 -0700 did write/type or cause to appear in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    Engineering Bromide: an overstressed system will relieve its stresses eventually. But wouldn't you rather do it in a controlled manner? - pyotr filipivich We will drink no whiskey before its nine. It's eight fifty eight. Close enough!
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On Tue, 11 Aug 2009 11:56:48 -0700, pyotr filipivich

True...but with some proper bracing..the racks are well enough made that I dont think he could fill them up and have them collapse.

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or about Tue, 11 Aug 2009 15:18:29 -0700 did write/type or cause to appear in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    Then it will no longer be an over stressed system.
    It is like the question to ask about medieval Cathedrals "When did the tower collapse?" The ones which remained were the ones which had enough stone piled up to keep from exceeding the stress limits. - pyotr filipivich We will drink no whiskey before its nine. It's eight fifty eight. Close enough!
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You don't even know what he is storing. His rack could easily be filled to capacity with thin wall tubing. Not to mention how heavily he intends to load it.
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Both quite true. However..He did post a link to a photo of his old rack..and it wasnt filled with conduit, or 3/4 empty.
As I keep saying..it was only observations. Take em or leave em.
Was there anything else you wished to boff your chest with?
Gunner
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What I saw didn't stick out from the wall to hold squat. Plus, they had no protection from having stock roll off the top row even if the pieces were sitting up there nice and even. There needs to be a stop to prevent just such a thing. It happens in the real world. And it always lands on the wrong thing.
Steve
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wrote:

Worst comes to worst...he can buy a box of cheap 3/4" nuts and simply weld em on the top of the end of the bars. Its not great..but it works...most of the time.
weld em upright..on a flat with the hole facing the material.
And he can use them to seperate the supports when the shelves collapse <G>
Gunner
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wrote:

The end of each angle has a hole drilled for a bolt and coupling nut to form a stop. needed for round stock optional for flat stock.
Thank You, Randy
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wrote

How do these holes work without the bolts in them?
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On Fri, 7 Aug 2009 10:57:15 -0700 (PDT), Too_Many_Tools

New pics......
www.enter.net/~rbraun/stockrack3.jpg
quite the mess ain't it.
note shelf in back of pic 3, I found short bars store nice in cut up peices of carboard shipping tubes, or 3" or 4" PVC if you want to be fancy.
www.enter.net/~rbraun/stockrack4.jpg
4" beam was used, plan "a" was to put the beam between the channels, but I wanted to keep the same height as the old rack to maintain the same spacing. ( A differant spacing might actually be better, but this was working for me.) Beam sits on top of channels with a 4" plate as a filler.
Thank You, Randy
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Full length pieces also store nicely in cardboard shipping tubes. We do a recurring job every few months where we buy 30-40 pieces of 5 mm dia. 303SS round rod in 13' lengths, and we just put the cardboard tube up on our rack and pull the pieces out one at a time as we need them. If they weren't in the tube it would turn into a mess of bends and kinks the first or second time someone tried to extract one :-). Plus it keeps the stainless steel rods from rubbing on the steel rack and picking up bits o' steel that would rust later.
----- Regards, Carl Ijames
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