50 - 60 Hz system

hey folks...... could anyone post da advantages and disadvantages of having 50 and 60 Hz systems and what is the effect if we adopt higher
freq system instead of 50 Hz?
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Perhaps you should ask yourself where do you intend to buy most of your appliances and what type of electrical system are you installing?
Although there are exceptions throughout the world, most 50 Hz systems are 240V and these systems are widely used in Europe, Africa, Asia (Japan is the exception at 100V. Nominal, about 1/2 50Hz, the other half has 60 Hz).
The 120/240 60Hz system is mostly used in the US, Canada, Mexico.
Some appliances (computers, electronics, mostly) are designed with universal power systems and can be used on any system, regardless of voltage or frequency.
However, there are many appliances that may give you performance problems or, in the worst cast, start smoking if you use them at the wrong frequency or voltage.
One of the original downsides of 50 Hz was that low wattage incandescent bulbs might have a noticable flicker. Some say that this is no longer a problem because of CF lamps.
AC Motors may run at different speeds when given different frequencies. This can affect things like clocks, timers on washing machines, etc.
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da nipple clamp
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Please do not write 'da' when you mean 'the'. We are not gangstas here.
The difference between 50 and 60 Hz is not very great and the two systems exist for historical reasons. Higher frequency means lighter motors & transformers (less iron) for a given power rating. Synchronous motors run at different speeds. 60 Hz motor may overheat on 50 Hz. Induced hum in audio equipment, phone lines, etc will be different pitch. Aircraft and some ships use 400 Hz for lighter motors transformers etc.
My 50 Hz filament lamps (UK) do not flicker that I can see, except when filament is about to fail.
Swiss German Austrian Scandinavian railways use 15 kV 16.66 Hz (16 2/3 Hz) (Norway Sweden) or 16.7 Hz (Ger Sw Aus) power for traction. Bulbs in signals etc run on power frequency flicker visibly. Some US railways use 11 kV 25 Hz.
Consult good electrical engineering textbooks for further information.
Wikipedia page
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/50_Hz
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On 3/5/07 1:39 AM, in article snipped-for-privacy@h3g2000cwc.googlegroups.com, "contrex"

Remember, they actually flicker at 100Hz.
Bill -- Fermez le Bush--about two years to go.
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Yes, I know, I was trying to compactly express that I live in a country where the AC power is described as 50 Hz.
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There are no big advantages or disadvantages between 50Hz and 60Hz, just differences and some incompatibility issues.
What has already been written is true, apart from the voltage it is mainly synchronous motors and maybe some transformers where frequency could be an issue. Some of the older turntables for hi-fi systems, clocks and timers use synchronous motors so these may not be compatible. I think that some devices may use the mains frequency to derive a "clock" frequency, perhaps some mains operated digital clocks may have used this though crystals aren't that expensive. Power factor correction for some devices may need to be changed for the different frequency.
One lesser known device where frequency is important is the ferroresonant transformer. While this isn't a well known device, I believe it is commonly used as the transformer in microwave ovens and will be tuned to a particular mains frequency. Using such a frequency sensitive component would not just be a problem if used in a different continent, but could also be problematic if powered from a petrol generator where the frequency may not have good regulation. A normal mains supply has a well regulated frequency.
If it answers your question, to adopt a higher frequency the effect would be that some appliances would no longer be useable. By "useable" I mean that for example, some clocks would work though they would not keep good time. There would be many devices where a different frequency would cause no noticeable difference. Mostly, it is voltage that causes incompatibility and not frequency.
If you were thinking of moving somewhere where there is a different mains frequency or voltage, it would be best to work out which items you want to take with you and asking a qualified electrician whether the appliance would work. Normally a mains operated appliance will have the operating range of voltages and frequencies printed on it.
I hope this helps
Bob
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