Chicago electrical exam

Im planning on taking my electricians exam on Nov. 20 in chicago. I have read all the suggested materials, including the entire American
Electricians Handbook, and OSHA part 1926. Not an easy task considering I run a full time business. My question is, has anyone taken the Chicago exam? Even after reading, and yes, understanding, all of this, I still dont feel that confident. I see alot of licensed guys that can barely spell thier own name that have passed. (I am assuming they got thier license through conventional methods, although this is Chicago) I guess what I am looking for is a little advice or insight into what I should concentrate on. No, I don't want answers, I wouldnt cheat. Thank You, Josh snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net
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Here in AZ the same folks that run the testing site also have prep classes that you can take. Our contractor test is broken into 2 sections, code and business. AZ does not license electricians. You must show 7 years of experience to take the contractors exam.
Sure hope you read the right code book some areas have not adopted the last revision. Most of AZ is still on the 2002.
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Those dam luddites I can't believe that they have not adopted the 2005 before the NEC finished it :-) Hell here they are still on 1999 code I figure that when the 2005 comes out they might move to 2002
William.....

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Chicago doesnt use the NEC, we have our own code based on the NEC. Our codes are more strict with relation to wiring methods and acceptable equipment. Our book is updated every 4 years as well, however Chicago is a lot more retroactive, they wait until something bad happens, then they re-write the code and licensing regulations! I dont know if you follow the news, but in the last year and a half, we had a porch collapse, (now they license General Contractors) we had a nightclub fire, (now they enforce occupancy and exits) and we had a county building fire where people got locked in the stairwell (reviewing evacuation procedures) I know it's for the greater good, but every time they rewrite something, it costs me more money. (about $700.00 per year in licenses and $6000.00+ in liability insurance) Josh
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Are you a General Contractor?

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Here in Alaska we adopted the 2002 NEC, but I wish we had stayed on the 1999 NEC. After years of memorizing section numbers the 2002 NEC changed many of them and placed metric before standard units. Hell, nobody uses metric. We did a Corps job a few years ago and the prints were in metric. We had one very difficult time converting all the numbers to something meaningful. Imagine all the pipe sizes in metric. It will be a real blast when they change all the wire sizes to metric. Lets see... 500 kcmil will become the square root of 500,000 in thousandth of inches converted to centimeters then squared. What will that be? California is still on the 1999 NEC. I don't see a lot of very significant changes in the 2005 NEC, but it sells books and update courses. I think the 1999 NEC was as about as good an electrical safety code as any.
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