Constitutionality of light bulb ban questioned - Environmental Protection Agency must be called for a broken bulb



Not only is it not a ban, but this also is not a matter of constitutional law.
The people who are saying it's a ban, and/or crying infringement of constitutional rights are either just plain idiots, have reading comprehension problems, have an agenda, or some combination of the above.
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says...

Strawman. Not all electricity comes from not need come from coal.

Exactly the point.
-- Keith
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Roughly half of all electricity generated and about 60 per cent of what is generated by electrical utilities.
Source: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/electricity/epa/epat1p1.html
Cheers, Paul
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snipped-for-privacy@ns.sympatico.ca says...

When was the last one built? When will the next be built? IOW, another asinine argument from a leftist weenie.
--
Keith

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Since you asked so nicely, according to the latest DOE report (February 18, 2008), as of September 20, 2007, there were 28 coal-fired power plants under construction (14,885 MW), 6 more nearing construction (1,859 MW) and 13 more that had received construction permits (6,422 MW). There were a further 67 plants (42,394 MW) that had been announced, but had not as of that time been issued permits.
Cheers, Paul
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Paul M. Eldridge wrote: ...

And to round out the picture, last I looked about a month ago, there were 28 iirc formal filings for licensing docketing by the NRC thru next fiscal year and some 20 others projected for the next couple of years beyond...
--
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Plenty of A19 lightbulbs 40-100 watts are USA-made. So are plenty of 4-foot fluorescents.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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wrote:

First of all, Congress did not "ban" incandescent lamps -- they simply set minimum efficiency standards, as they have with other consumer products such as air conditioners and refrigerators. Secondly, lighting manufacturers already sell high efficiency incandescent lamps that meet these new standards. You can buy these ones at Home Depot:
http://www.nam.lighting.philips.com/us/consumer/hes/display.php?mode=1
Cheers, Paul
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On Fri, 20 Jun 2008 14:33:54 -0300, Paul M. Eldridge

Of course... 70W IS less than 100W. Read the fine print on lumens output. Sheeeesh!
...Jim Thompson
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On Fri, 20 Jun 2008 10:47:48 -0700, Jim Thompson

Hi Jim,
A 70-watt soft-white Philips Halogen Energy Saver has a 3,000 hour rated service life and produces 1,600 lumens (22.8 lumens per watt). A Philips Duramax soft-white A19 incandescent has a rated service life of 1,500 hours and provides 1,550 lumens (15.5 lumens per watt). Watt for watt, a 70-watt Halogen ES generates 1.5 times more light.
Sources: http://www.nam.lighting.philips.com/us/ecatalog/halogen/pdf/p-5901.pdf http://www.nam.lighting.philips.com/us/ecatalog/incan/pdf/p-8493.pdf
Anything else we can clear-up for you?
Cheers, Paul
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Re: Constitutionality of light bulb ban questioned - Environmental Protection Agency must be called for a broken bulb
Roy says [{ I wasn't aware of this ban } i do know that Mercury,Sodium, Metal Halide bulbs must be dispossed of in a specific way]continues below=>
Group: alt.engineering.electrical Date: Fri, Jun 20, 2008, 3:09pm (EDT+1) From: snipped-for-privacy@ns.sympatico.ca (PaulM.Eldridge) On Fri, 20 Jun 2008 10:47:48 -0700, Jim Thompson
On Fri, 20 Jun 2008 14:33:54 -0300, Paul M. Eldridge
First of all, Congress did not "ban" incandescent lamps -- they simply set minimum efficiency standards, as they have with other consumer products such as air conditioners and refrigerators. Secondly, lighting manufacturers already sell high efficiency incandescent lamps that meet these new standards. You can buy these ones at Home Depot: http://www.nam.lighting.philips.com/us/consumer/hes/display.php?mode=1 Cheers, Paul Of course... 70W IS less than 100W. Read the fine print on lumens output. Sheeeesh! ...Jim Thompson Hi Jim, A 70-watt soft-white Philips Halogen Energy Saver has a 3,000 hour rated service life and produces 1,600 lumens (22.8 lumens per watt). A Philips Duramax soft-white A19 incandescent has a rated service life of 1,500 hours and provides 1,550 lumens (15.5 lumens per watt). Watt for watt, a 70-watt Halogen ES generates 1.5 times more light. Sources: http://www.nam.lighting.philips.com/us/ecatalog/halogen/pdf/p-5901.pdf http://www.nam.lighting.philips.com/us/ecatalog/incan/pdf/p-8493.pdf Anything else we can clear-up for you? Cheers, Paul ===============> The way I see it.,Though advancements in The Lighting Industry are appreciated for several reasons - Consumers have the right & will seek out & purchase the regular edison type incandecent bulbs. They are easy to install & use.......
Note That: Halogen as well as Quartz bulbs (and such others) operate at much higher temperatures and are not suitable for all locations., as in the case of the Average Family Residence with growing children, et al non electrically savy indivuduals................. Reported Fires have decreased dramatically with Consumer Education, but remain emminent where they are in use & prone to accidental falls.
TT
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On Fri, 20 Jun 2008 15:09:23 -0300, Paul M. Eldridge

I'll check those out. The ones I've seen on-shelf had less lumens.
...Jim Thompson
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Jim Thompson wrote:

That came to mind, but I didn't see the lumen output quoted on the page. What is it compared to a standard incandescent? The one incandescent fixture in my house has older Halogena lamps in it, the efficiency of those is exactly the same, but the life is longer, I've never had one burn out.
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CFLs will reduce mercury entered into the environment, the coal burned to generate electricity releases 2-3 times the amount of mercury over the life of the bulb.
What isnt made in china, even 30-45% of dental caps etc are made in china. how about poes tv, etc etc
Its not a ban,
Since when was an incandesant Effecient, do you know only 4-7 watts of a 100w bulb are out put as actual Light you can see, the rest is heat, Thats effecient? Put in 11, 100w bulbs and you have a 1000w heater, and now pay more to run the AC to remove that heat, and release more mercury from Coal plants to run that AC, They should be Taxed to death and CFLs rebated, not banned.
Poe is a moron and so are you for not seeing the facts and posting this crap, incandesants should have limited use in todays world
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wrote:

Seen any CFL's that'll work outdoors in the winter? I need a few for my yard lights. Got any that'll work on 3V DC? Need some for my flashlights. Will CFL's work in cars? Lots of incandescents there. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Retired Shop Rat: 14,647 days in a GM plant. Speak softly and carry a loaded .45 Lifetime member; Vast Right Wing Conspiracy Web Site: www.destarr.com - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
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On 6/20/2008 2:30 PM David Starr spake thus:

Well, he did say "incandescents should have limited use in today's world", which pretty much covers what you've described; the great majority of light bulbs are used for domestic, commercial or industrial lighting, where CFLs are appropriate. The few exceptions where incandescents can't be replaced or where it's impractical to do so are small potatoes by comparison.
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When you eventually buy a new car, new yard lights, or flashlights, they'll use LEDs. Manufacturers are already starting to switch over. You're stating a non-issue. Additionally, you'll still be able to get incandescents for those kind of utility needs. The efficiency law doesn't affect those types of bulbs. Go to the source and read for yourself.

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On Fri, 20 Jun 2008 17:30:58 -0400, David Starr

Here in Arizona's mild winters even regular fluorescents tubes flicker in my garage.
...Jim Thompson
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They're probably those crappy 34W energy saver tubes with magnetic ballasts that usually don't drive them harder than about 25W. Those were a hack from the 70s energy crisis and hardly work in a drafty room indoors. Try some electronic ballasts driving T8 tubes, they work fine in the near freezing temperatures in my unheated garage in the dead of winter. As an added bonus they're 32W and brighter than most of the old 40W tubes and the high frequency operation pretty well eliminates strobing with rotating machinery.
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James Sweet wrote:

Can someone please explain what T8, T12, etc. are and what are the differences? I have plenty of old T12 40W tubes, fixtures, ballasts, etc. I've had several people recommend updating the ballasts and tubes but are the keystones the same? Length of tubes?
nate
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