"Electronic" Rodent traps - Volts and Joules?

I was interested to see that electronic traps had largely replaced the spring-type, on the stand in my local farmers' shop.
Now the blurb on the box stated that 4xAA cells would kill ~50 mice.
If, very roughly, 4xAA gives 20kJ - that's 400J per mouse.
Which, if you pardon the expression, seems to either be massive overkill (10J being enough to put the average adult female human into VF) - or pretty inefficient design..
Anyone know what the electronics design of one of these units is?
Incidently, the average mouse weighs around 20g. 400 J should raise its temperature by around 20 deg C. So, are these units not actually electrocuting the mouse, but cooking it??
-- Sue
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Does it not give any clue as to operation on the packaging?
John
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John Nice wrote:

Not that I remember. I might buy one and find out.
-- Sue
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Actually you would be better off cleaning them and cooking on sticks with a satay dressing.
Rheilly P
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Funny; I was just looking at the same thing in a farm catalog today.
I'm not going to bother with the math, but ... after the first kill I'd assumy the batteries have xx% energy remaining. yy after the second, and zz after the thirs, and so on. So I imagine the juice is adjusted to insure enough left at the 50th kill to do so successfully. Time would also be another factor of course, plus ...
Twayne
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Palindrome wrote:

Mmmmm. Mouse.

Standby power? You might be able to kill a lot more than 50 mice if you can march them through the trap like cattle in a slaughterhouse.
[Looks at burger and puts it down]
--
Paul Hovnanian mailto: snipped-for-privacy@Hovnanian.com
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Paul Hovnanian P.E. wrote:

But mouse jerky doesn't stink.! Sticky traps do stink but squeals of distress can drive other mice away. This observation is based on: "in matters of survival, mice are smarter than humans."
--
Don Kelly
snipped-for-privacy@shawcross.ca
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Paul Hovnanian P.E. wrote:

Why should it need to consume standby power? The mouse can switch the thing on...
Say with a hinged small section of internal wall which operates a momentary connection trembler switch, when it is displaced. That starts up a step-up inverter that puts, say, current-limited 1kV between two foil strips running the length of the floor of the trap, for one second. Delivering it straight into one pair of feet and out the other, with the heart in between. IWHT 4J, per mouse, more than ample.
Of course the motorised belt that runs up the middle, to remove the remains into a suitable receptacle and clear the trap for the next volunteer, would use extra - say another 4J.
-- Sue (Mmmmmm US - the place to go for a REAL steak)
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Sorry, but I don't care much for this Item, I use Electronic Pest Repellents and let mice and rodents roam free outdoors, where they belong as food for and playmates for cats and birds. It's better than having them dead in my house, no matter how clean the disposal system is in those Zappers.Since I placed a few on certain outlets they just don't come inside any more.
BTW, I didn't call this group "Trolls", only those that respond as such., and there we have it.
RQT
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Palindrome wrote:

I think that the timer lasts for longer. I remember reading on one of their websites that the rat version had a 90 second timer because they sometimes survive if it is shorter than that. The mouse version was 30 seconds if I remember correctly. That information really put me off these traps - I have experienced high current electric shock for a few seconds and I regard it as very painful, so if the rat feels that for 90 seconds then I figure that it is a bit cruel. Still I guess not as bad as glue traps, which are thankfully illegal in many countries. I catch the mice and release them, but perhaps I am just feeding the owl that I sometimes hear at night...
Chris
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Palindrome wrote: <snip>

I'm all for fun-tech gadgets, but what's wrong with the age-old, tried-and-true snap trap? Fold the spring back, a tiny dollup of peanut butter, set it and forget it. Check in a few days, remove the whole thing, trap and mouse to the dustbin.
Around here, simple spring snap-traps are so cheap, you can through them away with the mouse. 90+% of the time it snaps the critter's neck so fast he doesn't know what hit him. No squeals, pretty humane way to kill the things.
daestrom
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daestrom wrote:

Oh, it's just me - take me to a moonlit meal overlooking Lake Geneva and, next thing you know, I'm looking at the power transmission line pylons going up the cliff, trying to work out the voltage... :(
Show me an electronic mousetrap and I'm not thinking about the "poor wee timorous beasties", but why 4 x AA batteries, what the sensor is, etc, etc..
Snap traps have their advantages, but triggering is often hit or miss. Electronic traps overcome the triggering problem - but, as another poster has described, the death isn't instantaneous. Plus the cost at 1 AA cell per dozen mice is high.
Maybe the solution is a hybrid - a mechanical spring trap with an electronic sensor/trigger?
-- Sue
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You know Sue, if I wasn't already married............. You sound like my kind of woman :-)
--
Stuart Winsor

For Barn dances and folk evenings in the Coventry and Warwickshire area
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Palindrome wrote:

Well it could. But does it? I've not taken one of these things apart (not even purchased one) to see how its triggered.
I'm thinking about the inverter in a camera flash. Some of the older ones (and higher powered units) made a whining noise and took a few seconds to charge. The smart mouse would recognize the obvious HF inverter whine and be driven off.

One company made a 'humane' trap, which consisted of a tube with a motor-cocked spring-loaded piston. The motor would push the piston near the open end of the tube, where it would latch, waiting for a mouse. When one entered the tube (where the bait was), it broke an IR beam which released the catch on the piston. The piston, driven by the spring would retract down the length of the tube rapidly, drawing a vacuum and pulling the mouse in. A ways down the tube, the bottom opened into a container into which the mouse, still alive, was deposited (no doubt thinking "WTF just happened?!!"). The motor would then drive the piston back to its cocked position.
You were given the choice whether to kill the mice or release them (far, far away, of course).

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From: snipped-for-privacy@hovnanian.com (PaulHovnanianP.E.) Palindrome wrote: I was interested to see that electronic traps had largely replaced the spring-type, on the stand in my local farmers' shop. Now the blurb on the box stated that 4xAA cells would kill ~50 mice. If, very roughly, 4xAA gives 20kJ - that's 400J per mouse. Which, if you pardon the expression, seems to either be massive overkill (10J being enough to put the average adult female human into VF) - or pretty inefficient design.. Anyone know what the electronics design of one of these units is? Incidently, the average mouse weighs around 20g. 400 J should raise its temperature by around 20 deg C. So, are these units not actually electrocuting the mouse, but cooking it?? Mmmmm. Mouse. -- Sue <snip> From Paul: One company made a 'humane' trap, which consisted of a tube with a motor-cocked spring-loaded piston. The motor would push the piston near the open end of the tube, where it would latch, waiting for a mouse. When one entered the tube (where the bait was), it broke an IR beam which released the catch on the piston. The piston, driven by the spring would retract down the length of the tube rapidly, drawing a vacuum and pulling the mouse in. A ways down the tube, the bottom opened into a container into which the mouse, still alive, was deposited (no doubt thinking "WTF just happened?!!"). The motor would then drive the piston back to its cocked position. You were given the choice whether to kill the mice or release them (far, far away, of course).
--
Sue
(Mmmmmm US - the place to go for a REAL steak)
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Did it come with a model rocket kit?
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From: snipped-for-privacy@bitbucket.gov (HopefortheHeartless)
One company made a 'humane' trap, which consisted of a tube with a motor-cocked spring-loaded piston. The motor would push the piston near the open end of the tube, where it would latch, waiting for a mouse. When one entered the tube (where the bait was), it broke an IR beam which released the catch on the piston. The piston, driven by the spring would retract down the length of the tube rapidly, drawing a vacuum and pulling the mouse in. A ways down the tube, the bottom opened into a container into which the mouse, still alive, was deposited (no doubt thinking "WTF just happened?!!"). The motor would then drive the piston back to its cocked position. You were given the choice whether to kill the mice or release them (far, far away, of course). Did it come with a model rocket kit?
That is a thought..or Catapult the insidious little varments to the next kingdom };-{)
The Mighty WontVolt
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Hope for the Heartless wrote:

Now that would be really cool. Right into the nose of a small rocket, fire it off, let the little parachute drift it away. That mouse would have a hell of a tale to tell.
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ingvald44 wrote:

Dartmoor (where I live) has quite a large natural bird of prey community - not to mention the odd school of falconry. I'm sure that they would much approve of this method of disposing of unwanted rodents. :)
-- Sue
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ingvald44 wrote:

Not very 'humane' though. As a kid we put a small frog in the nose of such a rocket. The results was a puree of blood and guts in the nose cone. We know the parachute opened properly and lowered the rocket slowly to earth as the rest of the rocket was quite intact (an unopened parachute would always result in a grounded rocket until we could repair the damage). We came to the conclusion that those little rockets have a *considerable* acceleration at lift-off :-)
daestrom
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