Mains wiring question (USA)

A 1-story, flat-roof house (no basement) in California is going to be re-covered, so it's a prime time to do some electrical upgrades.
The local building inspector says that romex cable run on the roof (before foam insulation is put on) must be covered by sheet metal stapled over it to protect from nail incursion (yes, he knows this is a *foam* roof, no shingles, etc., but no matter).
I've asked electrical supply wholesalers about this but they have no product such as this.
Is this something an electrical supplier would have? Or is just a roll of sheet metal stock what's called for?
Thanks.
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You might be able to use armored cable, the MX or whatever stuff. It's not very expensive.
John
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On Mon, 16 Aug 2010 20:06:54 -0700, John Larkin

You would buy the metal stock from the roofers. They use it to make up flashing and other transistions.
Charlie
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You might ask him how sheet metal, which staples can penetrate, will protect the romex from nails. The real requirement may be that you will need to run it in steel conduit. Art
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There is no logic to the declarations of building inspectors. He says if we choose to use romex (our option), we must cover it with metal strips wherever it is exposed.
Another option is to use armored (MX) cable or EMT conduit. Romex seems the simplest if we can find a simple metal strap to cover it.
Thanks.
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Wow. Foam roof and EMT vs romex, i would take a really serious look at EMT (and perhaps simple conductors instead of romex).
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On Sun, 22 Aug 2010 21:20:09 -0700,

Actually, thinking about what he is doing, i would be real tempted to go with something solider, like rigid, instead of EMT...
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wrote:

--
EMT _is_ rigid: "Electric Metallic Tubing."

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---
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John Fields wrote:

EMT is sometimes called "thin wall" to differentiate it from "rigid", which is similar to iron pipe in dimensions and wall thickness.
--
Virg Wall, P.E.

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I doubt seriously that his application would outstrip the strength of regular EMT. Just plan and install it AND the 'strips' correctly.
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On Mon, 23 Aug 2010 13:40:43 -0500, John Fields

Hi John, Not really. Rigid is a lot thicker and harder to work with than EMT, but it lasts literally forever if not physically damaged. EMT will dent if you look at it sideways... ;-)
Charlie
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wrote:

What? "Cheap Chinese" EMT and Superman looking at it?
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Charlie E. wrote:

Actually, you don't need to look it at side ways for it to get dented, we get it delivered that way, or at least that's what the guys lead me onto believing!
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On Aug 23, 6:32 pm, Jamie

EMT is widely used in the electrical trade. It is adequate for almost all uses.
Rigid is not used very often.
There is conduit that is between rigid and EMT in wall thickness - IMC - intermediate metal conduit. It is probably used more than rigid.
None of these need nail plates when they are near the edge of a stud. Neither dies rigid PVC conduit. Apparently the NEC considers them to be reasonable protection.
I don't see how any of these, in particular PVC or EMT, would be any problem in the OP's application.
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wrote:

I know it is the law but I never really understood how RNC (PVC) is protection against a screw gun or a nail.
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On Tue, 24 Aug 2010 13:05:45 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Deflects the nail? Contains the fire? ;-)
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On Aug 24, 1:05pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

The law on electrical safety codes sometimes Generalizes terms and applications., on that case a general application will require separate added adheres to meet All The Safety Requirements. Experience dictates that common sense and a eye for detail as you express here is better than just a General Safety Rule of Thumb.
One item in a Job List may compromise another and it is back to the drawing board if A Quick Reference Guide is not available...I suspect the OP has come here for that.
RR
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On Aug 24, 12:05 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

PVC does seem somewhat less protective. A drywall mechanic would probably be smart enough to stop and relocate when the screw did not drive in. Would be interesting what the relative resistance is for nail guns between EMT and PVC.
Bottom line is if there were dead bodies the NEC would have changed.
-- bud--
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wrote:

I doubt you would feel PVC pipe with a screw gun and a nail gun will shoot through both of them . You would need a direct hit on the EMT or hit it after aligning the nail in a little wood. Nail guns are simply awesome when it comes to available power. They will shoot nails into concrete.
http://gfretwell.com/electrical/nail%20gun%20vs%20EMT.jpg
    
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