Need help routing power to building

I am finished with the interrior wiring and trying to figure out the best, most cost effective, and easiest way to route power from my
attached garage sub panel to a 100 amp sub panel in my detached garage. I made a few videos becaue I am not good at explaining in type what exactly is going on. I really appreciate any constructive help!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NtuLkPAlJOc


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hVxQVP9TfhI

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I would run cable inside the wall from the panel, up into the attic, across the attic to the corner of the garage nearest the new garage. Then down the inside of the wall in that corner into a 12"x12"x6" junction box cut into the wall. On the outside I would use a 2" LB to come out of the back of the the junction box, continue down underground and under the sidewalk, and onto the new garage.
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ANy reason to go inside the wall rather than the outside? By the way. if I use #3 copper individual wires, does the ondiut have to entend into the wall and attach to the panel? Does it have to be use in the attic or can I just stable the wire to the ceiling joists?
I really appreciate it!
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Here is the last video. It shows my current attached garage sub panel that I would feed off of.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IPuJajmjrDo

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wrote:

Inside the wall is just to make it neater and to avoid potential damage to the cable being exposed like that. If you run individual conductors instead of a cable, then they have to be in conduit the entire length. That's why I suggested a j-box in the corner to make the transition from cable to conduit.
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So, if I run individual wires I need to have it completely in donuit in the attic and back down into the panel? How do I run a 2 inch onduit down a wall directly to the panel and getting everythign to line up?
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wrote:

In all honesty..experience.
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wrote:

Smurf tube. (Type ENT) I know you only see the blue 1/2" 1nd 3/4" in the depot but they make 2" and your electrical supply will probably sell it to you by the foot. It is listed to glue into a regular gray PVC male adapter or into a PVC conduit body.
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On Nov 3, 4:12pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Flexible Nonmetallic Conduit (smurf tube) is not permitted in the interior of dwellings unless enclosed in construction equivalent to half inch sheet rock. It's ire characteristics, especially it's smoke contributed rating, make it unsuitable for such use. This is not an NEC issue but rather a building code issue. Manufacturers are eyeball deep in the NEC revision process but it is fire marshals that control the fire code revision process. -- Tom Horne
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wrote:

Cite that, it is sure news to me. Smurf is made from PVC, similar to RNC. Are you also saying RNC can't be used too? Is this just your local fire marshal? I sure don't see it in the Florida Building code (IRC)
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"(1) Wiring Methods" below lists approved wiring methods and PVC isn''t one of them.
300.22 Wiring in Ducts, Plenums, and Other Air-Handling Spaces The provisions of this section apply to the installation and uses of electric wiring and equipment in ducts, plenums, and other air-handling spaces.
(C) Other Space Used for Environmental Air This section applies to space used for environmental air-handling purposes other than ducts and plenums as specified in 300.22(A) and (B). It does not include habitable rooms or areas of buildings, the prime purpose of which is not air handling.
FPN: The space over a hung ceiling used for environmental air-handling purposes is an example of the type of other space to which this section applies.
Section 300.22(C) applies to other spaces that are used to transport environmental air and that are not specifically manufactured as ducts or plenums, such as the space or cavity between a structural floor or roof and a suspended (hung) ceiling. Many spaces above suspended ceilings are intended to transport return air. Some spaces are also used for supply air, but they are far less common than those used for return air. This section does not apply to habitable rooms and other areas whose prime purpose is other than air handling. Such an area is shown in Exhibit 300.20. If the prime purpose of the room or space is air handling as depicted in Exhibit 300.20, then the restrictions in 300.22(C) apply, whether or not electrical equipment is located in the room.
Exception: This section shall not apply to the joist or stud spaces of dwelling units where the wiring passes through such spaces perpendicular to the long dimension of such spaces.
The exception to 300.22(C) permits cable to pass through joist or stud spaces of a dwelling unit, as illustrated in Exhibit 300.21. The joist space is covered with sheet metal and used as a cold-air return for a forced warm-air central heating system. Equipment such as junction boxes or device enclosures is not permitted in this location.
(1) Wiring Methods The wiring methods for such other space shall be limited to totally enclosed, nonventilated, insulated busway having no provisions for plug-in connections, Type MI cable, Type MC cable without an overall nonmetallic covering, Type AC cable, or other factory-assembled multiconductor control or power cable that is specifically listed for the use, or listed prefabricated cable assemblies of metallic manufactured wiring systems without nonmetallic sheath. Other types of cables and conductors shall be installed in electrical metallic tubing, flexible metallic tubing, intermediate metal conduit, rigid metal conduit without an overall nonmetallic covering, flexible metal conduit, or, where accessible, surface metal raceway or metal wireway with metal covers or solid bottom metal cable tray with solid metal covers.
Revised for the 2002 Code, 300.22(C)(1) no longer permits liquidtight flexible metal conduit as covered in Article 350 to be installed within ``other spaces used for environmental air.'' The previous exception permitting this application for single lengths up to 6 ft was removed.
(2) Equipment Electrical equipment with a metal enclosure, or with a nonmetallic enclosure listed for the use and having adequate fire-resistant and low-smoke-producing characteristics, and associated wiring material suitable for the ambient temperature shall be permitted to be installed in such other space unless prohibited elsewhere in this Code. Electrical equipment with metal enclosures is allowed within spaces used for environmental air. However, nonmetallic enclosures must be listed for this use.
Exception: Integral fan systems shall be permitted where specifically identified for such use.
It is not intended that the requirements of 300.22(B) or 300.22(C) apply to air-handling areas beneath raised floors in information technology rooms. See Article 645, Information Technology Equipment.
(D) Information Technology Equipment Electric wiring in air-handling areas beneath raised floors for information technology equipment shall be permitted in accordance with Article 645.
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Rich
I'm afraid that you are off your soundings here. The sections you quote all pertain to the spaces that carry air back and forth to the HVAC system. They do not apply to an ordinary attic unless the entire attic is being used as a return air plenum which is not the case here.
-- Tom Horne

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On Nov 4, 11:55pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I'm guessing that the Florida Building Code is based on the Southern Building Code which has always been a builders code. The Southern Building Code, National Building Code, and the Uniform Building Code are each dominant in particular portions of the county. There provisions have never been fully reconciled. -- Tom Horne
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wrote:

The Florida building code is based on the IRC (ICC codes) There is no southern building code anymore.
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stryped wrote:

I think he meant individual wires in conduit underground to junction box then cable to switch board (I might be wrong)
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