Power routing or Non-power routing turnout??

I am constructing a small HO layout using Kato Unitrack. The turnouts can be set for power routing (the default setting) or non-power
routing. The change between the two reuires shifting only 2 screws. Kato recommends the power routing for DC operations, and the non-power routing for DCC operations. I would not normally have considered non- power routing due the complexity of the switch construction needed, but here is a relatively easy way to accomplish non-power routing. I do not plan on running more than one train at a time, though several locos may be parked on the layout.
Questions: Why is Kato recommending these useages? What are the real advanatages of non-power routing? Is it worth the effort of converrting the Unitrack switches? Any suggestions would bee appreciated. Thanks.
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" snipped-for-privacy@cox.net" skriver:

Because power routing can save you from crashes if you run a conventionel powered layout. Power routing means that the turnout is turning power on and off to the two tracks it is joining together. But it requires that you insulate the tracks going to the turnout.
-------------------------------------------------------------- \ Turnout \ Straight \ -------------------------------------------||----------------- \ \ \ \ Isolation \ \______________________||__________________ \ \ Turn \__________________________________________________
If go straight, the power is taken ayaw from the short isolated track between isolation point and turnout. If a train is runs into the isolated unpowered trac it stops.
Fleischmann calls it "thinking turnouts".

If you run DCC it is a good ide to allways have full power to all tracks. You often don't use isolated parts of the track running DCC.

Yes.
Klaus
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" snipped-for-privacy@cox.net" wrote:

The advantage of non-power routing is that DCC locos on sidings etc are powered at all times - ie lights etc remain on. The advantage of power routing is that for DC layouts locos on sidings etc are only powered when there is a route available for them - ie it cuts down considerably the number of toggle switches required.
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If you run ALL DCC then go non-power routing. You will need fewer power drops. DCC will work with power routing turnouts so its not a critical issue. The reason DCC doesnt need power routing turnouts is you can turn the throttle off on any DCC unit, park it, and run the other locomotives. That is the big advantage of DCC. You can park an engine anywhere. Useful if you only run one engine at a time.
I run DCC with a DCC power unit that can run DC locomotives also. I used power routing turnouts so I could park my DC locos and they would not run when another DC loco was running on the track. This setup works fine with DCC. I did need more power drops however.
If you use power routing turnouts to connect, say, two seperate loop/ circles of track, the track between the two loops will be dead if the turnouts are set to allow traffic to flow around the loops. This is USUALLY undesirable. On the other hand, it is usually desirable to have dead track on a siding.
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