Philips calls for a simple switch to reduce energy consumption

By partnering with The Alliance for Climate Protection and the global
Live Earth concerts on July 7th 2007, Philips aims to inspire more
than two billion people to take simple steps, such as changing a light
bulb, to lead a more energy efficient life. I saw the details at
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Reply to
georgemathew12
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| By partnering with The Alliance for Climate Protection and the global | Live Earth concerts on July 7th 2007, Philips aims to inspire more | than two billion people to take simple steps, such as changing a light | bulb, to lead a more energy efficient life. I saw the details at | |
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I already have CFLs where CFLs don't cause problems. Once they make some light bulbs that don't hurt my eyes, then I can also put those in places where I use task lighting for extended (e.g. more than 10 minutes) times, such as the kitchen. FYI: it's NOT the flicker ... it's the spectrum.
Reply to
phil-news-nospam
Perhaps you should hold out for the LED lamps.
Because the last for a LONG time, once they "catch on" a good portion of sales will be to folks who don't HAVE to replace a working LED but want to because the newer model has better color.
Right now the CFs still wear out. My home is now nearly saturated with CFs but I still have to buy them occasionally just to cover burn outs.
Reply to
John Gilmer
They use much the same phosphors as fluorescent lamps.
Their colours are currently appauling. They pick the colour which gives the highest lumen/watt so they can claim 1% more than their competitor.
I hate to tell you, but LEDs used for lighting (as opposted to low power LED indicators) also wear out. The phosphor output drops off, but also you get complete failures at a rate governed by the operating temperature, but at very much lower operating temperatures than for CFLs or filament lamps.
Reply to
Andrew Gabriel
As I understand the present "technology" the LEDs are actually UV LEDs with phosphors to convert to visible light.
But, but ... If you end up with a array of LEDs why not just but a mix of various colors together. You can make up any color you want. It should be more efficient than the UV/phosphor LED or am I missing something?
Reply to
John Gilmer
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----------------------------- They are available in good spectrums for reading and other tasks- as with regular fluorescents they may be a bit more expensive than the cheapest "cool white" bulbs.
Reply to
Don Kelly
| | |> I already have CFLs where CFLs don't cause problems. Once they make some |> light bulbs that don't hurt my eyes, then I can also put those in places |> where I use task lighting for extended (e.g. more than 10 minutes) times, |> such as the kitchen. FYI: it's NOT the flicker ... it's the spectrum. | | Perhaps you should hold out for the LED lamps.
Maybe. LEDs have the same issue, at least for now.
| Because the last for a LONG time, once they "catch on" a good portion of | sales will be to folks who don't HAVE to replace a working LED but want to | because the newer model has better color.
If they fix the color issue, great.
| Right now the CFs still wear out. My home is now nearly saturated with CFs | but I still have to buy them occasionally just to cover burn outs.
I only have 5 in place and have had them only for a year and a half. All still work fine. 4 of them are outside in the cold (in winter) and have had no trouble other than taking a few minutes to warm up to give full brightness (not problem enough to switch back).
Reply to
phil-news-nospam
| |> |> |>> I already have CFLs where CFLs don't cause problems. Once they make some |>> light bulbs that don't hurt my eyes, then I can also put those in places |>> where I use task lighting for extended (e.g. more than 10 minutes) times, |>> such as the kitchen. FYI: it's NOT the flicker ... it's the spectrum. |> |> Perhaps you should hold out for the LED lamps. | | They use much the same phosphors as fluorescent lamps.
Except for the ones made from multiple LED colors. Both have the issues.
|> Because the last for a LONG time, once they "catch on" a good portion of |> sales will be to folks who don't HAVE to replace a working LED but want to |> because the newer model has better color. | | Their colours are currently appauling. They pick the colour which | gives the highest lumen/watt so they can claim 1% more than their | competitor. | |> Right now the CFs still wear out. My home is now nearly saturated with CFs |> but I still have to buy them occasionally just to cover burn outs. | | I hate to tell you, but LEDs used for lighting (as opposted to low | power LED indicators) also wear out. The phosphor output drops off, | but also you get complete failures at a rate governed by the | operating temperature, but at very much lower operating temperatures | than for CFLs or filament lamps.
It's obvious they wear out. Replacement LEDs are available in stores.
Reply to
phil-news-nospam
| | |> I hate to tell you, but LEDs used for lighting (as opposted to low |> power LED indicators) also wear out. The phosphor output drops off, |> but also you get complete failures at a rate governed by the |> operating temperature, but at very much lower operating temperatures |> than for CFLs or filament lamps. | | As I understand the present "technology" the LEDs are actually UV LEDs with | phosphors to convert to visible light. | | But, but ... If you end up with a array of LEDs why not just but a mix of | various colors together. You can make up any color you want. It should | be more efficient than the UV/phosphor LED or am I missing something?
If there are enough different wavelengths, that might work for making light that is suitably white and with a continuous enough spectrum to really act like white. I've seen 22 different wavelengths in various catalogs. That might be enough to do it. Adjusting the levels of each wavelength to get a nice white might be a lot harder.
Reply to
phil-news-nospam
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|> |> |> | By partnering with The Alliance for Climate Protection and the global |> | Live Earth concerts on July 7th 2007, Philips aims to inspire more |> | than two billion people to take simple steps, such as changing a light |> | bulb, to lead a more energy efficient life. I saw the details at |> | |> |
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|> |> I already have CFLs where CFLs don't cause problems. Once they make some |> light bulbs that don't hurt my eyes, then I can also put those in places |> where I use task lighting for extended (e.g. more than 10 minutes) times, |> such as the kitchen. FYI: it's NOT the flicker ... it's the spectrum. | | ----------------------------- | They are available in good spectrums for reading and other tasks- as with | regular fluorescents they may be a bit more expensive than the cheapest | "cool white" bulbs.
I've never seen any with the needed continuous spectra.
Reply to
phil-news-nospam

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