Power Supply Question

We use a couple different 24VDC power supplies to drive testing
instrumentation we manufacture. Recently we've been told that using a
supply with "Automatic" voltage inputs (120V/230V) puts our equipment
at risk when used on a 230V circuit and one leg drops, causing an
"under voltage" situation, blowing up critical components because the
supply cannot switch back to 120V fast enough. We have never
experienced this and never had any of our international customers
report this problem.
I am aware that power supply manufactures do make 120V or 240V input
power supplies, but I am unsure as to what applications these apply to
and cannot find any information pertaining to the above scenario.
Any help is appreciated.
Chad
Reply to
ckramer7070
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The only definitive answer is to ask the manufacturer of the power supplies concerned.
Lower-power power supplies (~1kW but I doubt that applies to your instrumentation applications.
However, unless you can post the circuit diagram with values, the manufacturer is the one to ask.
Reply to
Palindrome
Usually I go by the "If it works, leave it alone" method. When confronted by a situation such as yours, I like to do a little research. While that may involve a question in a newsgroup, I prefer asking the manufacturer (as Palindrome suggested).
A switching power supply shouldn't much care what the voltage is, as long as it's within the rated spec. If it's a quality power supply, it'll automatically shut down when the voltage drops below safe levels.
If your really worried about it, look into getting a good UPS, which will protect your power supplies against both spikes and drops.
CS
Reply to
CS
Our supplies didn't have hard switches. They were what we called "auto-switchers, and would run from about 90 Volts all the up to 265 Volts. That is single phase, BTW, so there is no "one leg drops out" problem.
I have never seen a circumstance like that which you describe.
A 240 V capable input is meant for UK single phase applications, not US 3 conductor, dual phase (center tapped) systems.
Reply to
ChairmanOfTheBored
What do you mean by "dual phase" in regard to US scenario?
Reply to
Long Ranger
Look at the parentheses. It is single phase, center tapped.
Reply to
ChairmanOfTheBored
Yeah, I saw that. I thought there was some system out there I didn't know about. Thought I'd learn a new trick. So, what do you mean by "dual phase"?
Reply to
Long Ranger
The same thing he meant by "drop a leg".
Reply to
ChairmanOfTheBored
Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm.
Reply to
Long Ranger
I've finally received full information pertaining to the workings of this issue. Our parent company is manufacturing custom linear power supplies for a couple of their applications, the engineer who developed this supply set the switching value at 190V. So when a "brown out" situation occurs on a 230V supply and drops to 190V, or below, the supply switches and blows the fuse. The custom supply configuration was not relayed to me initially and I was assuming this supply was a purchased part.
Thanks for the input,
Chad
Reply to
ckramer7070

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