Recommendations for electrician apprenticeships.

I have been turned down by the IBEW for their eletrcial apprenticeship.
Does anyone here have other recommendations for apprenticeship
programs, sponsored by trade unions or not, that I can look into if am in interested in pursuing the electrician trade?
Is 32 an age where I have to start considering age discrimination in this field?
Brian Ghilliotti
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Why were you "turned down"? I think that would be an important questions that needed to be answered.
Also, how many times have you been "turned down"? We have tons of members who did make it on the first attempt.
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim wrote:

It could be that I may have been too slow with the "peg board test" during the aptitude test.
I have been traditionally slower with mathematics, which could have shown on the SR- (whatever number) test. In highschool I never had a motivation to learn math, I never saw a reason to take it seriously (how does it apply to life?...the failure to answer this question is one of the significant weaknesses of the US education system, and one of the biggest reasons for highschool drop out rates, accordng to one study). So I neglected it. Anyways, I have been slower processing numbers anyway. That is the way my brain is. I like to do my work carefully.
Math is boring? Ok then... I can go ahead and say that in any apprenticeship and go straight back to Wal-Mart if that is the attitude I chose. A 32 year old man in poverty (with his family almost wiped out) thinks a bit differetnly than an 18 year old in highschool.
It could be that I did not present myself well during the interview. I get nervous and crack up in public speaking situations, or situations like it, such as interviews. When I showed up to the interview, I had already thought of some questions they could ask and wrote down prepared answers for them. I was almost giving a small speech.
It may be that I explained that my expected time for National Guard AIT training was delayed untill fall. I was hoping to knock it out by summer and be ready for the apprenticeship in the fall, but lack of funding delayed it till October. I explained this situation, provided documentation for it, and asked that if I was accepted into the program, could they defer my entry into the program till next year. The interviewers said they would consider it. Perhaps they turned me down just on this matter, not opting for the deferrment plan I proposed.
I will only know on Monday.
But anyways, I might as well consider other apprenticeship programs out there instead of putting all my Easter Eggs in one basket. If people here can aid in my research for other trade union or non trade union sponsored (hopefully with 'low tuition')apprenticeships related to electrical work, please let me know.
Doesn't make much sense to just apply and put all your expectations on a single college, does it? Same thing applies here...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If the Unions turned you down try Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC). I think they are in Washington D.C.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

It could be the work situation in the area. You could find out how many applications they had and how many apprentices they accepted.
New apprentices were only taken once a year when I got in 1984 (It took me 4 years)
Keep trying. The age limit was 24 when I was accepted. I was 24. I think the age limits are higher now.
The apprenticeship courses are heavy into math. I would think anyone's electrical course would be.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Brian, Math is important but 95 per cent of electrical construction work is nothing more than specialized labor work or what we call grunt work. There is plenty of need for you in the electrical field. If you can't get into the IBEW hire out as an electrical helper for a nonunion shop or try working for an electrical supply house. I have a degree in math with 53 credits in Mathematics and am a journeyman wireman and electrical administrator. I just got my 30 year IBEW pin the other day. So I should have an idea of what I am talking about. Remember being an electrician requires cognitive learning (book learning including math), psychomotor skills like using tools and climbing a ladder, and affective learning or attitude like getting along with others. Using the tools and getting along with the boss and your fellow workers is much more important than the math. The IBEW knows this but have so many applicants that they use the math to eliminate people.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.