Service entrance/Main panel upgrade

I'm in the US and have 60amp service in home, I'm upgrading to 200 amp and just want to make sure I'm all good before I call the inspector out
and find out I need this or that added or done differently.
What I've got now is 4/0-4/0-2/0 coming into the weatherhead and down to a 200 amp can, 4/0-4/0-2/0 from the bottom of the can down and through the wall into the 200 amp main panel. Also, #4 ground goes to the buried ground rod from the ground clamp in the meter can. All this wire is run through plastic pipe of the proper make, glued and sealed up.
At the main panel is where I really have questions, do I need to carry another #4 ground from the can down into the main panel or does the #4 ground from the panel ground to the water jacket (on copper pipe) suffice? I've got a piece of plywood that will be mounted to 2x2's (so the main breaker box isn't too close to the wall) but the plywood scrap I had handy is just a tad smaller than the main breaker box is. It's wide enough but about two inches short of being long enough, there is plenty of room for the mounting screws but is it ok that the box overhangs a little? (3 or so inches)
My local city has adopted the NEC 2000 code according to the inspector so that's what I have to meet, or better.
Thanks for any help! Mike
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when the type of wire is omitted we will assume copper. What insulation is the 4/0 some juristictions will have kittens if your using THW. Where I live it is XHHW for service conductors.
Grounding the meter is good, but where I live you will either need to provide proof by testing that the ground rod is <25 ohms or drive a second one. Most inspectors will walk away if they do not see 2 ground rods. Remember that the ground rod need to be spaced more than the distance they are long for greatest effectivness.
PVC conduit will require a ground wire to the panel. Or did you mean the ground wire was in pvc? PVC is not rated for exterior work where I live. #4 solid does not need protection

I am really confused here. The number #4 is a grounding electrode, you need a grounding conductor, something like a #4 insulated or bare should be large enough, dont have the code book handy. Metallic piping is BONDING which yes is another bare #4 at the point of service. Not some handy spigot that is close to the service. I can not figure out if your mounting an all in one or the meter and panel are seperate. If they are seperate you could have other grounding issues by using the pvc. Here we usually install all in ones, cause it is SO MUCH easier than all of the nipples and bond bushings.
Where I live 2x2 and plywood smaller than the service can will not fly. They demand mounting to the structure. But that is a local thing here.

Your on your way, best of luck, sure hope you checked with the utility about the mounting location and fault current available. Some times it is higher than the 10k stuff commonly sold.
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On Mon, 09 Jan 2006 02:58:15 -0700, SQLit wrote:

Aluminum from the weatherhead to the can, and from the can to the main panel. I think it's XHHW. I can't find the receipt at the moments and it's dark outside. ;)

The conduit is PVC (and ok for exterior application here), the #4 is bare copper ground wire.

Separate, unless I wanted the main breaker box in my bedroom (which would also mean running all new wiring because the existing stuff wouldn't make it that far) What I meant by #4 is the bare copper wire running from the can (grounding lug) to the ground rod. I have that, do I need to run another #4 bare copper wire from the can grounding lug to the main breaker box? I am running one (#4 bare copper) from the main breaker box to the water pipe as it enters the house.

The 2x2 is just to keep the plywood off the concrete wall so I don't have any moisture issues. The plywood being smaller than the main breaker box is fine according to the inspector I spoke with today since it's just a couple inches short in one dimension.
Thanks to everyone that responded. Mike
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One other thing...How far is it from the meter can to the main panel? I can't remember the distance...seems like IIRC 16-24" YMMV..but if it's longer than that specified distance, you will be required to have a service disconnect on the OUTSIDE by the meter. Unless that changed in the last few years.
--
Anthony

You can't 'idiot proof' anything....every time you try, they just make
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On Tue, 10 Jan 2006 23:01:19 +0000, Anthony wrote:

I'll check, but I don't think I need one. It's less than 5 feet, more like 3 I think.
Thanks, Mike
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wrote:

The distance is not specified, the only issue is the distince inside the building anyway. Even that is unspecified but local AHJs make up a rule.
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You sound like you are OK but SQL is right about the 2x2s. Mount the plywood directly to the wall and your panel to that.
On Sun, 08 Jan 2006 16:20:40 -0600, Mike Martin

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All good.

The latter is correct. ground the panel to the waterline (ahead of the valve). If you have gas lines you should bond that as well.

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