Starting Again

Hello all,
I am trying to get back into electric engineering again, I had some
schooling years back. I don't have the benefit of going back to school
right now, so I want to do it myself.
I would like to know if, assuming I have access to my own lab equipment,
anyone can recommend a good college level text *with/and* a good lab
section/manual.
I realize this is a broad request and any help would be much appreciated.
Thanks,
Marc
Reply to
Marc
Loading thread data ...
man did you come to the wrong place with this hehehe
Reply to
reqluq
what level of text?
DC fundamentals? AC behavior? digital? RF? motors?
Reply to
TimPerry
Here are my recommendations:
TAB Electronics Guide To Understanding Electricity And Electronics, by G. Randy Slone RadioShack - Basic Electronics By Gene McWhorter & Alvis J. Evans RadioShack - Basic Communications Electronics By Jack Hudson & Jerry Luecke
Although these are not college texts they are my picks for starting over, which I did about a year ago.
Have fun!
Jim Douglas
Reply to
Jim Douglas
"The Art Of Electronics" By Horowitz and Hill is a good reference manual, although I've not seen a new edition for some years.
In there you will find all the practical knowledge to qualify you to pass degree-level examinations. The theory isn't there very greatly, so it's a set-of-the-pants guide as opposed to an acadaemic course of study, but well worth the shekels charged.
On the Radio Ham front, "Solid State Design For The Radio Amateur" is another good text with the theory limited to need-to-know seat-of-the-pants stuff.
"The Electronics Handbook" edited by Whitaker, CRC Press/IEEE Press is/was a concise, if heavy going, summary of all the latest techniques. 2500 pages! I bought a publisher's remainder copy for £15, I'd estimate that new it'd be ooo £100.
Reply to
Airy R. Bean
You seem to have the wrong idea of what a E.E. education is about. It's primarily an applied math curriculum. So forget playing with the fun stuff like lab equipment and start hitting math books.
Reply to
dave y.
whew,at last! hehe I thought I was losing it for awhile there;I mean you guys were actually appearing to be helpful :-)
Reply to
reqluq
Actually I had planned on doing that as well. But finding the right math material is easier than finding the right E.E. theory/lab material. At least in my case.
Reply to
Marc
...
Of course I sounded like a smartass, but I also was serious. EE is almost entire applied math, and if you don't do the math up front, there's no way you will be able to fight through the EE texts. And unless you love math it won't be fun, and if it's not fun it won't be easy doing all that work on your own at home. Bottom line is, you're better off taking classes at your local college or whatever is available. ihmo of course.
Reply to
dave y.
I agree College is always best, if you can go that course, I studied Electronics & Physics and understanding the atom down to the electrical/electronic level has helped me understand much of the math & science behind Electrical Engineered works. i could do power factor calculations for different sized AC circuits and figure out what wire to use easily with the electronics course, my circuit analysis and the american electrician handbook.
The AC & DC training is basicly the same andwhen you get to the semiconductor theory is just like with E. E. but it's like an Exploded version of what happens in micro circuitry., you have to find it fun otherwise you won't put up with it., so, use you imagination and get the course
when i was studying it was common developing mental of psychological trauma for students into heavy theory., so watch your self accordingly.
I guess we figured out how mathematically f--ked up this world really is };-) so much to do, such little numbers.
Reply to
Roy Q.T.
I would love to finish the college route, my situation just doesn't permit it in the foreseeable future. Rather than sit around and let my brain collect dust, I'm trying to simulate the college experience as much as I can. At least the academic part. ;)
I've had a taste of all this before, so I have the benefit of knowing that I love the math and the theory. But it wouldn't be complete without lab work. Hence the emphasis I put in my original post.
Reply to
Marc

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.