Tesla's original patent application for the AC Induction Motor Aug 5, 1890

I just came across this and find it rather amazing. It is at: http://www.keelynet.com/tesla/00433701.pdf

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Perhaps they posted it to 'prove' that Tesla 'knew what he was talking about' and so do they??
Of course, many of Tesla's works were brilliant. But many were also balmy. Trouble is weeding out which is which.
daestrom
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Don Kelly wrote:

It is amazing that Tesla filed about 20 patents on motors, most from 1886 to 1889. Patents cover 2 and 3 phase and many variations for single phase including cap start and many variations for split phase. The patent above was not one of his better ones. Additional patents covered AC generators and transmission. He covered the possibilities so well AC motors couldn't be made without using his patents. (Many companies used a traditional response, they infringed.) I never heard his name in school (except maybe for the Tesla coil). Have things improved?
Tesla also has the basic patent for radio - using an L-C circuit for tuning. His 1900 patent was found to have priority by the US Supreme Court in 1943. This is even more buried than his contributions to AC.

LOL. I forgot Keelynet was a center for 'alternate' physics.
They probably have Tesla's death ray (his papers were impounded for years when he died and some are apparently still classified) and the 'conspiracy' to suppress transmission of power (including his unfinished tower at Wardenclyffe, Long Island, New York).
-- bud--
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I learned about Tesla from a book and tape loaned to me by a friend of one of the sons of our former governor, Mike Stepovich here in Alaska. The Stepoviches are Serbs and it was during the crisis in Yugoslavia that I came across this material evidently distributed to gain some respect for the Serbs. I continue to study Tesla from time to time and am amazed by this man's discoveries. One of the stories has it that after arguing with one of his professors about the use of AC for a motor, he drew the outline for the first AC motor on the ground for a classmate using a stick. Another story has it that Tesla never used drawings or calculations on paper but was able to create in his mind what he wanted and could walk into a shop and direct mechanics to build his creations. I am beginning to think Tesla is becoming somewhat of a legend and as these stories grow, maybe in a few thousand years, he may be able to walk on water.
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---------- Tesla's name is not forgotten in the electrical machine and power world. Note that the unit for magnetic flux density in the MKS system is the Tesla (used to be Weber/m^2) He made many contributions and the polyphase machine and variants are what he should be remembered for (the transformer which made long distance transmission possible was invented by Gaulard and Gibbs). Unfortunately, in his later years, claims and facts and mental deterioration meant that most of what he then did was useless. I would like to remember him for what he really did.
--

Don Kelly snipped-for-privacy@shawcross.ca
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Hello, and it's regrettable that outside of the EE community Tesla isn't generally recognized for his lasting contributions to the art. It's ironic that the device most asscociated with Tesla has no apparent practical use (unless you count a TV flyback transformer which is not really a resonant transformer).
The U.S. Postal Service did honor him (along with Armstrong, Steinmetz and Farnsworth) in a commemorative stamp issue some years back. Margaret Cheney does a decent job IMHO in her bio on Tesla although the author in a few instances gives the impression that some of Tesla's fantastic contrivances (such as a hand-sized "earthquake generator" causing wild vibrations of a bridge) worked as claimed. Sincerely,
John Wood (Code 5550) e-mail: snipped-for-privacy@itd.nrl.navy.mil Naval Research Laboratory 4555 Overlook Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20375-5337
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