What happens when you blow a fuse really hard?

bud-- wrote:


Its possible to install current limiting fuses ahead of service equipment that would not, by itself, withstand an increase in available fault duty. But, from what I've seen, utilities rarely know when their upgrades will push customer equipment beyond its rating.
Utilities I've worked with do not keep track of customer facility specifications. If a knowledgeable customer gets wind of an upgrade, they may do a coordination study and install CL fuses (rather than upgrading the service equipment). But very few customers are knowledgeable and most, if warned, wouldn't understand the consequences of ignoring the heads up.
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Paul Hovnanian mailto: snipped-for-privacy@Hovnanian.com
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If you blow a fuse really hard, your cheeks will puff out, and you will become dizzy if you do it for very long. Try using compressed air.
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Long Ranger wrote:

The most dangerous aspect of this is when you inhale before blowing. If you aren't careful, you could swallow the fuse.
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wrote: | Long Ranger wrote: |> |> If you blow a fuse really hard, your cheeks will puff out, and you will |> become dizzy if you do it for very long. Try using compressed air. | | The most dangerous aspect of this is when you inhale before blowing. If | you aren't careful, you could swallow the fuse.
Just turn your head sideways before inhaling. I found it works quite well. I'd be more worried about what diseases the fuse might have.
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| Phil Howard KA9WGN (ka9wgn.ham.org) / Do not send to the address below |
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snipped-for-privacy@ipal.net wrote:

Always use protection. I guess this is what they mean by protection coordination.
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Paul Hovnanian snipped-for-privacy@hovnanian.com
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It will buy you dinner.
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| What happens if one were to overload a fuse so strongly the fuse's | maximum safe interrupting rating was exceeded? My guess is that it | would start arcing enough to allow high current through the device it | is protecting for a (relatively) protracted period of time, therefore | potentially causing damage to it (and hence defeating the purpose of | the fuse, which is to _protect_ the device from damage). Not to | mention the arc itself might be damaging as well (due to the high | temperature.). Is this right? | | Is there a video or something showing what happens?
You've gotten a lot of answer so far. Obviously some good and some bad. Now it's back in your court. Let me give this one suggestion: make the video in MPEG or Theora format.
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