What voltage in Florda, USA ?

Hi, Im going on holiday in a couple of weeks to Orlando, Florida. Can anybody tell me what the domestic voltage supply is.
Regards
John
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wrote:

Same as everywhere else in the US.
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120V 60Hz (as JackShephard says- the same as in the rest of the US) In Canada, it varies, in summer it is 120V 60Hz but in winter, a much higher voltage is needed to keep the polar bears out of the garbage.
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Don Kelly snipped-for-privacy@shawcross.ca
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John C wrote:

you will need to have some kind of converter if you bring your UK stuff... it will probably be easier to just buy cheap electric shavers and the like when you get here.
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wrote:

Don't UK shavers run on 120 V (at 50 Hz)? I keep reading that the Brits have small step down tranformers in their loos for just these shavers.
Beachcomber
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Beachcomber wrote:

These things:
http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?ida532&ts 573#
Actually an isolating transformer with both voltages output.
The only mains socket allowed in most bathrooms.
Wouldn't another useful thing for a Brit to take to Florida be a phrase book? ISTR finding it difficult to shop without one...
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Sue







Often seen with an electric toothbrush plugged in to charge, rather than
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An up-to-date phrase book, to be sure. The language changes with each new high school graduation (c;
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A spanish phrase book?
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OK, just a friendly follow-up question from one of your neighbors in the states.
What happens when UK residents want to use a blow dryer, curling iron or an electric toothbrush? Do you folks just get used to not using those appliances in the bathroom?
If 240V is supposedly just as safe as 120V, why isn't it allowed to be used for those bathroom outlets?
Beachcomber
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Beachcomber wrote:

You want the theory or the practice?
An electric toothbrush will be double insulated and be approved and have the special plug needed to use in a shaver socket in a bathroom.
If the bathroom is big enough, sockets can be fitted away from the wet area - but that size bathrooms are few and far between.
So, either you use the stuff in the bedroom instead of in the bathroom, or be very, very naughty and use an extension lead.. Which is scarily common - I've seen umpteen houses with extension leads in the bathroom, powering (metal) heaters, mood lights, electric kettles, you name it. In one flat there was a mains radio sat on a shelf over the bath... You could just reach up out of the bath to change the channel/volume..
It would have been far, far better to realise that people will use electrical equipment in a bathroom and found a safe way to do so - rather than turn a blind eye to the much more dangerous practices that they get up to because of the lack of sockets/fused spur outlets.
Who said 240v is as safe as 120v? All the portable equipment used by tradesmen on building sites in the UK will normally be 120v.
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Sue

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Saws, drill, and such are 120v? Are neutral conductors made available? Or do they take isolation transformers on-site to do conversion?
Sounds quite odd: a separate market for 120v tools, whereas I would presume that the majority of tools available in UK are 240...
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DaveC wrote:

Here's a saw that is allowed on a building site:
http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?cId 1401&ts8448&idb391
Same thing in 230v, meant for a workshop/ private use rather than on site:
http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?cId 1401&ts8497&id8132
Here's a site transformer:
http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?cId 31855&ts8582&id158
This is its big daddy where 3 phase is available:
http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?cId 31855&ts8847&idr321
Most domestic supplies are two wire plus earth single phase. So the neutral is used (normally bonded to earth) with a single "live" wire.
I have both 110v and 230v tools. Plus my workshop has a 30mA current imbalance trip on its 230v supply.
(For 230 read whatever between 210 and 250 takes your fancy...)
--
Sue





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Palindrome wrote:

What are 'typical' service amp ratings?

Fascinating how US and UK (probably Europe) systems are so different.
In the US 30mA is used for equipment protection. For protection of people 5mA is used - required in many areas of a house. The information I have (60Hz) is let-go threshold is 10-16mA and severe shock - difficult breathing is 15-23mA.
Is your 30mA RCD for protection of your tools or you? Does the UK have RCD protection required for people? Trip level? RCD on 120V construction sites? My vague recollection is that is 2 hots each 60V to earth? 'Normal' leakage a much bigger problem than US because the voltage is 230?
-- bud--
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Bud-- wrote:

The regs say, "The accepted lethal level of shock current is 50mA and hence RCD's rated at 30mA or less would be appropriate for use where shock is an increased risk".

Me. It is common to use 500mA RCD for protection against fire, 100mA for whole installation and 30mA for the sockets.

As above. 30mA.

The only socket outlets on the site are 110v centre tapped to earth, with a 5 sec disconnect time. Inside the site huts 230v 0.4sec circuits are permitted.

Certainly I have several bits of test equipment that leak small currents to earth from their inlet filters, by design. So a 5mA RCD would be constantly tripped, if I plugged the lot in.
--
Sue

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The problem with that thinking is your muscles can lock up at 6ma or higher and you might not be able to let go.
http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/construction/electrical_incidents/eleccurrent.html
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Palindrome wrote:

I agree with gfretwell that 30mA seems really high. Although IIRC a recent post from Andrew said his back yard socket was protected at 10mA.

Glad it is you - you're to interesting to loose.

Interesting how the US and UK solve the same problem. 5/0.4 sec RCD? instantaneous trip? over-rated-current trip?

After thinking for a minute (always dangerous) it would seem the leakage would be double that in the US at 120V. Or a little less adjusting capacitor current for 50Hz. I wasn't aware leakage was a particular GFCI problem for test equipment here.
-- bud--
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Bud-- wrote:

Almost all the tools I use outdoors are petrol-engined (although mostly modded to use a push-on model aircraft starter as I am really wussy at pulling starter cords). The electrical stuff is all 110v or lower. I'm in Devon near Tavistock where, "...in Tavistock it will rain" - try googling on "Tavistock rain".
I tend to keep working even it if is raining as otherwise I'd never get anything done..so 240v tools are not a good idea, outdoors.

Many have said something similar, although normally expressed as, "much too dangerous to let loose". My recent (failed) experiment with a mixture of aluminium and magnesium filings, ground up rust flakes and the content of some fireworks did make quite a mess. I now have several cobblestones to replace.

I get the feeling that 240v is seen as dangerous and regulations for its use are very thorough. Whereas there is an attitude that 110v is not really dangerous and so the regulations where it is used allow a lot more..

AFAIK, this was just a period of technology where new, static-sensitive and otherwise fragile devices where being used for the first time. That could be wrong and could be entirely unrelated.. However, I do have several bits of kit labelled, "Visually inspect only - do not PAT". I did fancy a T shirt with that slogan...but not enough geeks around to appreciate it..
--
Sue



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Palindrome wrote:

Another Palindrome masterpiece.
-- bud--
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Bud-- wrote: <snip>

Sorry about that. I do have a habit of going OT and wittering. And/or going off witter and tittering. You really should say, "enough", earlier..
--
Sue

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Palindrome wrote:

Wouldn't want to. I thought your post was really funny plus educational.
Who else starts gasoline engines with a model aircraft starter - a prime example of sloth-based engineering (IMHO a major engineering discipline).
The post was an example of why "you're to interesting to loose".
-- bud--
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