Which Book on the selection of electric motors???

I want to be able so select the right motors for the right applications. Very often people choose motors on behalf of their experience only, not knowing why and
how. This bothers me. I want to be able to select motors such as Shunt DC Motors, Compound Motors, Permanent-Magnet Motors, Capacitor-Start Motor, Shaded-Pole Motor, hysteresis motors, induction motors, and all the other small weird motors found in fridges, hard disc drives etc etc.
So far I have come to the following conclusion:
1. I need a book where all the different motors are shown with their characteristics (torque/power/current curves). 2. The controls have to be explained too. Controlling a motor in a different way completely changes it's characteristics (curves). 3. The book can be in either english or german.
I have browsed numerous books on the topic without any luck. Does anybody know of some good literature?
Regards, Lucas Jensen
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The only thing that I can recommend is "Electric Machines" by Mulukutla Sarma. It was the text in my electric machines class in College, and while it is complete it isn't designed as a reference. It is nice because it teaches all that theory so that (theoretically) you can figure out how a motor is going to function for you in some unusual application.
It would be nice to have all the specs gathered together, though.
--

Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
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On 26 Oct 2005 03:02:02 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Have you looked at the McGraw-Hill "Electric Motors Handbook", which I think provides a reasonable overview of motor types and their characteristics (but not much on controls; I think you are asking too much of one book).
Torque/power/current curves are probably best obtained from motor manufacturers.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

There's lots of info out on the internet regarding the characteristics of various motor types, if you know about the motor, and you know the characteristics of the load, then it's pretty straightforward to choose a suitable motor to drive it, it's not rocket science.
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See my ring stretched right open!
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You might find the publications here of help:
http://www.bodine-electric.com/Asp/Literature.asp
Basics of Fractional Horsepower Motors and Repair by Gerald Schweitzer (I believe this is out of print but available through Amazon, isbn.nu, etc.
Ditto Smeaton Motor Application and Maintenance Handbook.
Lots of books at http://books.mcgraw-hill.com/index.php Search under engineering.
I'm not sure you can find one book that will cover clock motors, 100 hp polyphase motors, and servo disk drive motors.
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-- Tzortzakakis Dimitrios major in electrical engineering, freelance electrician FH von Iraklion-Kreta, freiberuflicher Elektriker dimtzort AT otenet DOT gr
wrote:

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----------------------------
wrote:

-------------------
I suggest that you get some new texts. I have one on hand, published in 1991 which covers, in addition to the typical machines that you mention, an introduction to power electronics for motor drives, switched synchronous machines, including stepping motors (used in some computer hard drives as naturally suited to digital control), brushless DC motors, etc. This is "Performance and control of Electrical Machines by Denis O'Kelly (no relationship) McGraw Hill. There are, I am sure, many other texts, but all will will have different areas of emphasis so "one size fits all" may not exist. Some are covered in more detail than others but references are given. All boil down to variations of the same principles. The type of motor used in a hard drive is hardly an industrial secret when one can go to the local computer store, buy one and take it apart.
Manufacturers will give information on the characteristics of their machines (as well as the perceived advantages) as they want you to be a customer. What is required is sufficient knowledge of motors to sort out the fact from fiction.
--

Don Kelly @shawcross.ca
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YOU ARE MY MAN!!! Hitting the link above and scrolling down gives you a selection guide in PDF. PERFECT. You made my day. :-)
Lucas
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-- Tzortzakakis Dimitrios major in electrical engineering, freelance electrician FH von Iraklion-Kreta, freiberuflicher Elektriker dimtzort AT otenet DOT gr

Shunt Dc motors are very widely used, when someone wants to change rpm at will.compound generators were used to provide welding current for arc welding.Generally in industry and domestic dc motors are very rarely used because of the brushes.Permanent magnet motors are used in tape recorders, cd players etc.capacitor start motors were used in refrigerators with a combination with a centrifugal switch, but now are replaced with capacitor running motors.shaded pole motors are used in hair dryers and some turntables.I've never heard of hysteresis motors.The fridges usually have totally normal single phase asynchronous motors while the hard drive certainly must be having brushless motors or you would have to open the drive to change the brushes.I'm not certain you will find a book that will cover all this, after all exactly how such a motor works and why a manufacturer chose this motor type eg for a hard drive is an industrial secret.

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----------------------------

------- Hysteresis motors exist- mainly used at one time for clocks or for high quality phono turntables (since replaced by cheaper brushless DC motors ). They have a nearly flat torque speed curve from 0 to synchronous speed so have good starting torque and acceleration but once up to speed run as synchronous motors. They are not new- at least 80 years old. Found only in small sizes mainly because of prohibitive cost/benefits at 1/4HP up sizes, and typically with a shaded pole stator.
No industrial secrets involved in the choice of a motor for a given task. Look at the requirements for speed, torque, cost, need for control of speed or position and look at the pros and cons of different motors. Then choose.
--

Don Kelly @shawcross.ca
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