Why does impressioning work?

As the subject reads, my question is why does impressioning work? Wouldnt there always be pressure on the pins causing a mark to be made? In essence each pin is just a long pin with a break in the middle, and all the springs are of standard tension. So why is there no mark when the shearline is formed? Wouldnt there be a markings until the spring is fully at rest? It obviously works, just wondering why.

Reply to
ragtag99
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This is treading on the line of "defeating instructions", in my opinion, and is a question I'm really not comfortable answering on the newsgroup or for a stranger. Sorry.

Reply to
Joe Kesselman

formatting link

Reply to
Key

thanks, the answer was right there in paragraph one. I was under the impression that the marks were left by the force of the spring pushing down on the pin, not the pins being bound in the shearline, it makes more sence now.

I hope nobody misunderstood the post, its not the 'hows' of impressioning I was interested in it was the 'whys'. Thanks for the help

Reply to
ragtag99

This information is far, far too detailed for me to write on a public news group.

Reply to
Stormin Mormon

who are you thanking ? try using quotes. one may be able to tell who you're responding to.

g'day

Reply to
Key

And one manufacturer uses pins with such blunt bottoms that they do not leave a distinguishable mark.

Reply to
Peter

I was thanking 'Key' by hitting the reply option under his post, but i see that doesnt work well. He was also the only person to give me the information i was looking for so thanks for the link 'key'. And Peter gave the good tip about blunt bottom manufacturers.... do you know which manufacturer that is off hand or is it just generally obtained knowledge?

But why is everyone so secretive about WHY impressioning works, simply saying "the pins leave a mark do to binding at the shearline, when they are at the shear line they no longer have the tension to leave a mark" isnt rocket science and is a far cry from how to defeat a lock.

Reply to
ragtag99

actually, 2 --Shiva--

Reply to
--Shiva--

Probably 3 if you were not thinking of Bi-lock.

Reply to
Peter

never seen a bi lock.. was thinking of several years back 5 pin Ford ignitions with stainless steel pins for #2 --Shiva--

Reply to
--Shiva--

your welcome...

I gave you a link that was already out there. you really could have searched for it yourself. however, "impressioning a key" is a way to defeat a lock. check out the FAQ for this group

formatting link
may help you understand why certain information is not given on an open forum by the true professionals around here.

g'day

Reply to
Key

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