Anyone know a solution to this problem?

Hello, i have a bit of a problem which i was hoping i might find a solution to on this group. I need to make large scale stencils which
are to be placed on top of a photoresist material. The stencil material
must be transparent and allow uv light wave lenghths to pass through it. The designs i want to put on these transparences must be in a very dence black ink. The ink must be impenatrable to light. The scale of these stencils i want to produce is anything from half a square metre and up to multiple square metres. I want to take an image from a computer file and blow it up to much larger scales onto this transparent stencil without loosing too much detail. tracing designs by
hand is far too time consuming and spending 50, 000 pounds on a big print machine is not anything like in my league. If anyone knows of an alternative manual way this can be done without buying a giant print machine i would really apreciate the info. Would also like to hear from
anyone who can tell me the cheapest light proof black ink and possibly where i can obtain some.
Unfortunatly any solution will have to cost penuts as i have no money to invest maybe a couple of hundred quid maximum for materials to experiment with.
hoping for advice.............A
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Try and find a local graphics company with a linotronic printer. A 3600dpi linotronic printer gives you a 7.05um wide line. We typically bump up the line width to at least 21um for a good line quality (ie: straight). I believe the wavelength of our UV bulb is 380nm. The transparency seems to hold up under the heat of the light. We have a resist that requires a 2 minute exposure, and the transparency mask holds up under repeated use.
Dwayne
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Depends on type of light and filter for wave length.

3600dpi
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