atomic spacing of latex?

Hi, would anyone know, how far apart are the atoms in latex or rubber pls?
Thanks ant

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On Mar 24, 8:15 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

Same distance as in the average organic compound.
Mike
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Thanks for replying, would you know what distance that would be?
Ive been unable to find the information using a google search
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

that's because you're asking an undefined question like "how long is a piece of string". there are a multitude of factors - both interatomic and intermolecular. you need to be precise about the question. starting with "why" would help.
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where would i find the online directory that has the information i seek?
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

Somewhere between half an angstrom and one and a half angstroms will cover all of the possible nearest neighbor bonded atoms in latex.
A lot smaller than a football. A lot larger than a hydrogen nucleus. About on the order of the size of the atoms, in the first place. Which makes sense.
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