Hai, what are your favorite elements?

Pick at most six. Here are mine: rhenium, tin, bismuth, caesium, thorium, beryllium.
-Aut

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As the universe expands a certain relation of element to element occurs, causing the relative masses element to element. And the best possible combination as the art is my choice.
I start with a little quanta of choice and the fifth element. And make a sequence.
Causing my little own chart of the nuclides. So six quanta can cause the set, a whole chartlet.
So Hydrogen and i forget five.
H1+E5 H1_E5-1c H1-E5-2c . . . ...nc
where c is an atomic mass unit
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Rhodium, copper, phosphorus, vanadium, manganese, silver.
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Atomic numbers 123 to 128, I suppose ;-)
No, I'm being flippand: Osmium, Lanthanum, Freon, Hydrogen, Iron, and Lawrencium.
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Where is this freon?
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Meant flourine - the "special" bit in freon and teflon and all sorts of fun things.
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In sci.physics, WizWom
wrote on 29 Mar 2007 21:19:20 -0700

That must be the special substance added to a grinding wheel while feeding it with grain; the results can then be combined with some other stuff to make bread...
:-)
As for fluorine being "fun"...apart from the small amount one might get in one's toothpaste and the aforementioned teflon and freon, and the extremely small traces in our atmosphere, I for one don't see myself wanting to even come close to things such as hydrofluoric acid...
--
#191, snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net
Conventional memory has to be one of the most UNconventional
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Nitro, Iron, Carbon, Rb, Neon, Germanium.
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On 3/23/07 8:57 AM, in article snipped-for-privacy@b75g2000hsg.googlegroups.com, "Autymn D. C."

This proves that stupid questions do indeed exist.
Bill -- Fermez le Bush--about two years to go.
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Muonium, positronium, protonium, antihydrogen, phlogiston, and polywater (even though it is a chemical compound and not simply an element - it outranks orgone in my list). I am also partial to electron holes.
Tom Davidson Richmond, VA
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Lutetium.
Not only is the name cool, but like me, it is the heaviest of the rare earths.
Dangerous Bill
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Interesting choices. Mine:
Ag
Os
Ir
Pt
Au
(money metals)
I can't decide on a sixth; I read that Ho has "unusual magnetic properties" but can't seem to find details.
I also vaguely remember some claims that either Tc or As would make wonderfully light, strong steel alloys except for the minor half-life issue.
Just kidding. Favorite elements are those that I can eat (C, H, O, N). Traces don't count. ;>)
Mark L. Fergerson
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Technetium is an implausibly good corrosion inhibitor; you can keep normal steel in 50-micromolar pertechnetate solution for twenty years and it doesn't rust.
I like scandium, gallium, and most of the middle row of the transition elements, particularly the noble ones; every so often I check to see if anyone has made the Doc Smith superalloys analogous to steels but based on ruthenium and niobium rather than iron and vanadium, and if they have Doc Smith super-properties. I have samples of gallium, tantalum, molybdenum and diamond on my mantlepiece; scandium's a bit expensive and the rare earths aren't really quite air-stable enough for me to want to have lumps of them around the house.
I work in crystallography, where almost all the heavy metals turn up at some stage thanks to despairing 'soak the protein crystal in solutions of hexammineeverything and see if it binds' experiments, and almost all the light metals turn up for actual biological reasons, except scandium and gallium. Looking at an ion channel full of thallium makes it very clear why the stuff is so toxic.
Tom
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my favourite are:
Osmium
Cesium
Uranium
Aurum
Francium
Radium
All have special properties... a good interface to share ideas.... any comment on these selections will be appreciated.
i and Autymn still await this "freon". what is it? thanx
Regards, Divij
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Dear Divij Rao:

Fluorinated hydrocarbons. Take a light hydrocarbon you may know and substitute fluorine for one or more hydrogens.
David A. Smith
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wrote:

Fascinating; its 97 and 99 isotopes actually have usable halflives (1ky, 5810^5y). Know if anybody actually ever made anything using it? I recently discovered the old Bomarc ramjet engines were made with a Hafnium alloy.

Ah, yes, Leybyrdite and Dureum.
I suspect he picked them for his superalloys knowing they were so rare nobody'd be able to call him on their alleged properties for a very long time. ;>)

I have several samples of rare-earth "alloys" lying around; they're also known as "lighter flints".
Mark L. Fergerson
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Thank you for your thread. I seem to be the onely person who kens the overlidom of rhenium. If nobody can tell what "penmetallia" means-- HgCl, SnO~2, dvialuminia-stannia for exempl--then I will stay the onely.

Gd does, for magnetocaloric. Nd and Ho are expected to stick out magneticly, as they're in the middel of the f-block.
http://elementsales.com/props.htm#ho http://google.com/search?q=highest-magnetic-moment+OR+greatest-magnetic-moment
Look at silver go!
Oddly, the CRC Handbook (2000) lists NdCo5 and PrCo5 as better magnets (B_r) than Nd2Fe14B, but the last time I checkd there was no commercial application for these newer cobaltides.

That is why I like bismuth: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Bismuth#eat_it . As for your elements, you can eat char but it may be carcinognic, and you can gulp the other gasses but what's the point? As for elements I can eat, I like S--great smell--and its thiomethether is what brininess in the sea truly comes from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dimethyl_sulfide . Which should be "brimminess" however, as it's not brine.
The lanthanides are atxic, as are the nobil d-block metals, even Hg I suspect. The nobiles only hold txic species as compound salts or chelates. Thus the media should distinguish between the properties of "metallium" and "metallium(N)".
-Aut
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I can translate all of that except "overlidom" and "penmetallia". The latter is what I'm used to seeing as "transition metals"? If so:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transition_metal
doesn't seem to give a good reason to exclude Re (but notice Hg is excluded).
Too bad there's so little of it; it would be useful in so many ways.

Wikipedia says it "has the highest magnetic moment (10.6B) of any naturally-occurring element and possesses other unusual magnetic properties."
That's the sort of thing that drives me crazy(er).

Could be their physical characteristics aren't amenable to typical manufacturing processes. Look how long it took ceramic magnets to get from the lab bench to car speakers.

;>)
Oh, I could have said "suitably combined" as in carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, but in the SF world the concept of "CHON food" is so old hat I didn't think it needed explaining.
Also I rather should have said that the other two elements you allowed be taken by fractions from the other less prominent but eventually equally necessary components of food; Ca, K, P, I, the assorted so-called trace metals, and so on.

And a rather important component of foods like garlic. Yummy!

The media. Feh! They're lucky to say "element" when that's what they mean.
Mark L. Fergerson
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snipped-for-privacy@bid.nes wrote:

Yes, but the bigger question is: Why would you bother trying to translate it?
--
Erik Max Francis && snipped-for-privacy@alcyone.com && http://www.alcyone.com/max /
San Jose, CA, USA && 37 20 N 121 53 W && AIM, Y!M erikmaxfrancis
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Harks back to my LSD days.
Mark L. Fergerson
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