how to test rinsing agents?

seek a valid homebrew test method for rinsing agents. These are chemicals which reduce the "stickiness" of water droplets and encourage
the water to run downhill and drop off the cleaned item.
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dances_with snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

See: http://www.google.com/search?q=testing+wetting+agents
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Using RO filtered water for a rinse helps to leave nothing behind even if beads of water are left to evaporate off an item.
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Research a product known as "Photoflo" (sp?). It is a wetting agent manufactured by Kodak that is used to eliminate watermarks when processing photographic film.
I have no idea what its chemical consist is, but it is very effective in breaking down the surface tension of water. It's so effective that years back I witnessed a demonstration of it being put into a small pond, and it caused the ducks in the pond to sink!!! I'm not kidding.
It's likely the world's best rinsing agent, but I cringe to think what it would do if even in small concentrations was ingested into the human body. That sort of rules out the practicality of its use in dish washers.
Were I to do research on rinsing agents, my first step would be to contact Kodak and try to pry out of them the chemical content of Photoflo. That failing, I'd buy a bottle (if it's still being marketed) and chemically analyze it.
Harry C.
dances_with snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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Just as an afterthought, I reseached Kodak Photoflo Using Google and quickly got it's content from an MSDS. Here's what this wonderful wetting agent is in its concentrated form,
30-40 Water (007732-18-5) 37 Ethylene glycol (000107-21-1) 25-30 p-tert-octylphenoxy polyethoxyethyl alcohol (009002-93-1)
Mmmm, flavor!
Now seriously, could anyone except Kodak's organic chemical division come up with something like p-tert-octylphenoxy polyethoxyethyl alcohol and combine it with ethylene glycol to make a product? Kids, remember to carefully wash your hands before leaving the darkroom. :-)
No, not in my diswasher!
Harry C.
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I would doubt that stuff rinses off. I would guess it forms a very thin film and gets absored into the emulsion, as the water evaporates.
--
Ron Jones
Process Safety & Development Specialist
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wrote:

That "nasty" chemical is in some hair care products: St. Ives Hair Repair Thickening Shampoo Volumizing Treatment For Fine Hair, Grecian Formula 16, Liquid with Conditioner http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/brands?tbl=brands&id 027001
in at least one paint http://www.benjaminmoore.com/msds/1033/m096.pdf
and similar non-ionic surfactants are used in dishwashing detergents.
Ernie
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