ink jet printers in materials science

According to articles in Science News, materials scientists have been
playing with ink jet printers since they were invented, using them to
print with materials other than inks, such as plastics or metals in
solution.
I'm wondering whether the scientists who were doing this happened to write
detailed accounts of the printers they used and the precise procedures they
used to modify them. If you know of publications in which they explained
all this, I'm interested in knowing about it.
Reply to
Allan Adler
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Allan Adler wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@nestle.csail.mit.edu:
I'd check in the patent literature first. Its waay past researcher notebooks, and has become a full-blown industry, so scientists in the private sector are unlikely to be sharing the details of their early work, excpet where they are legally protected. The whole rapid prototyping industry (is based around this technology;
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A compiled link page about rapid prototyping;
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Some major rapid prototyping companies;
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Instead of a prototype, make it a one-off, customized working part;
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Rapid prototyping hits the mainstream consumer market via the World of Warcraft MMORPG;
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FigurePrints makes deal with Dell Corporation;
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The Rapid Prototyping Journal might have more technical details for you;
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Regards, R. David Zopf Bomar Specialties Co.
Reply to
atomweaver
Thanks very much for your help.
Reply to
Allan Adler
I'm tempted to make one of my own:
reprap.org
I'll probably never get that project started, but it sure looks like a way cool tool to have in my workshop.
Reply to
dvt
Suggest put inkjet or such into Scirus search engine.
bob
Reply to
Bob
dvt wrote in news:frgge8$1534$ snipped-for-privacy@f04n12.cac.psu.edu:
I know!! The "garage tinkerer" potential is near-infinite...
Here's another DIY design with a bit broader capabilities, if you go that route;
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Regards, R. David Zopf
Reply to
atomweaver
Allan Adler wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@nestle.csail.mit.edu:
No problem,
heres one more link to a FigurePrints article, this one in Desktop Engineering magazine, (because the article is new, and some of the pictures are pretty impressive);
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Regards, R. David Zopf
Reply to
atomweaver

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