painted airtight windowscreen

Anybody tried to use painted airtight windowscreen(fiberglass or nylon?)as a flat surface covering material?
I have looked at (via google) various aircraft covering materials(some
brandname)and am not impressed with their costs, their "painting" requirements (labor+++), their mechanical toughness or their local availability.
After installation probably two coats of paint would provide an airtight surface
OR
the window screen could be painted on a flat polyethylene surface, let dry and then installed.
Since the screen is so thin, two layers (one grid oriented 45 degrees to the other) would provide a very strong and tough surface.
Any opinions? TIA.
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Allan Morrison wrote: ...(clip)...

Strong and tough relative to what? The greater the velocity of the aircraft the more apt the material would be to be torn or punctured by any foreign material it encounters in the atmosphere, even particles. If I'm right, the vulnerability of the material would increase with velocity in a manner greater than linearly up to a point and then level off as a higher pressure slipstream is formed. But piloting a craft with a "skin" of such type at airspeeds approaching those of a modern two-seater would probably be hazaradous.
If you're determined to try, however, think of Mylar which is a type of polyester. It's extremely difficult to tear, although it can be cut or punctured. Even cutting or puncturing is more difficult with Mylar than with almost all other thin sheet plastics.
Mark 'Sporky' Stapleton Watermark Design, LLC www.h2omarkdesign.com
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