Mark's Handbook edition question

Hi,
As I'm graduating with a BS in ME quite soon, my family wants to get me
something. I've referred to Mark's more than a few times while in
school and think it would be a great thing to have in my personal library.
Does it matter, within an edition or two, which ed. I get? I can't
imagine many things changed much from the last edition to the
current(which is # 10). The ninth ed is available for much less money;
but if it makes a real difference, I'll specify that.
along those lines- does anyone think there's a *better* all-around
handbook out there?
TIA,
k wallace
Reply to
k wallace
Loading thread data ...
I would say that it would probably be OK to have not the latest edition. Mine is the seventh ed., but then I graduated over 40 years ago. Other texts that I have used most over the years: CRC Standard Math Tables and Roark for stress analysis.
Reply to
Oops
Another book you may want to consider is the "Machinery's Handbook"
Reply to
YouGoFirst
MHis a great book but it is not in the same class as Marks! Hank
Reply to
Henry Kolesnik
something. I've referred
thing to have in my
many things changed
available for much less
I have both the 7th and 9th editions of Marks. They are slightly different as one would expect, but I prefer the 7th. Before retiring, I was involved in the design of rolling mill machinery (Pittsburgh, PA) and found the following texts to be very helpful in addition to Machinery Handbook and Marks:
"Tool and Manufacturing Engineers Handbook", Daniel B. Dallas, ISBN 0-07-059558-5 "Piping Handbook", Reno C. King, ISBN 07-013841-9
Be aware that all four of the mentioned texts most likely are well over $100.00 each. Look at the various engineering McGraw-Hill Book Clubs. That is how I bought most of my handbooks more than 25 years ago.
Jim Y
Reply to
Jim Y
It HAS been said that mech engineering hasn't changed much since 1900.
And it's true I keep an old Marks around. Withing one or two of the latest would be a most desirable gift, I'd suggest.
I hesitate to say it, but having a beam code and a plate code running on a home PC is very very helpful to an engineer and not a great expense. That HAS changed a whole lot in thirty years.
Brian Whatcott
Reply to
Brian Whatcott
Brian Whatcott wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
It depends what sort of mechanical engineer you are going to be. Personally, I've never found Mark's much more than a hack's crib sheet.
In the same software based theme, how about MathCad?
Cheers
Greg Locock
Reply to
Greg Locock
I would recommend getting hardbound reference material. I am a P.E., and if I need software, it is provided to me by my company. I would also say the same thing about electronics. I have a PocketPC which I used a lot, before my boss bought me a laptop.
Maybe you should get some exercise equipment if you can't decide on reference materials. I think that many ME's would agree that you tend to pack on a few pounds once you get your first engineering job.
Reply to
YouGoFirst
My focus in school has been thermodynamics and fluid mechanics, and I want to work in the power industry, either directly or on the analysis end. I don't have a ton of interest in designing parts, but I'm okay on a computer with 2D and 3D modeling. For software, I currently have and/or use Mathematica and MatLab (for numerical analysis stuff), SolidWorks, and StarCD. I really don't know *exactly* what I will end up doing. I have a beam demo and column demo program on my home pc, but haven't used them since junior year mechanics of materials stuff. A hardbound book I got for a class and have referred to a bunch since for personal projects even is Shigley's Mechanical Engineering Design. As far as electronics, I'd be lost w/o my palm pilot, but haven't been able to afford a laptop yet though it would be *very very* helpful, a large percentage of the people in my classes have them (but also, a large percentage of the people in my classes are being supported by Mom and Dad, not footing their own bill with math tutoring and foaming latte's...I make a hell of a coffee at this point.)
What do you mean about Mark's, hack's crib sheet?
I like to have books around, anyway.
thanks for the input, all,
k wallace
... and as far as investing in exercise equip...school has already done me in. I used to run 3mi a day, now I'm lucky to get in 3 mi a week, and I eat 7-11 burritos more than a good salad. Sheesh. I need to work on that :/ .
Reply to
k wallace
[snip]
I find the references very useful but infrequently so. That is, when I encounter something new I often go to Marks handbook (lots of good reference information on standard components), the Machinery handbook (if you need to actually have someone make a widget), Roark's ... (infrequently but it is occasionally useful), and Shigley's handbook (sometimes useful for machine elements and other related topics.)
Reply to
Anthony Garcia
"Anthony Garcia" wrote in news:MrzMe.3058$ snipped-for-privacy@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com:
Most of my work relies on first principles, and designing components from scratch. Marks provides rules of thumb, and established fudge factors, for many, but simple, cases.
If you are going to design factories it may give you what you need, but if you are trying to design things that actually use materials or components efficiently then it is only a rough introduction.
Shigley and Roark's are fine books, much used in this office. Roark is great for checking up on FEA.
Cheers
Greg Locock
Reply to
Greg Locock

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.