Be the Norm Abrams (This Old House) of metalworking

Anybody out there interested in being the Norm Abrams of metal
working? I'm thinking of doing a metalworking video series along the
lines of the New Yankee Workshop except for metalworking and needto
find an interested experienced machinist/toolmaker/enthusiast to be
the "main man". I have an old lathe,several other pieces of shop
equipment, a drill press milling table, an old and a new video camera,
some video editing equipment, several computers with video editing
capabilities,and a garage with room to build a shop.
First, understand that this is only an idea. I've never done it
before. I have the elements of an idea but not the experience. I have
some of the tools but not the know-how. There is no money available
but a lot of enthuisiasm.
The topics for the show(s) would be the basics: setting up a shop
area, rehabilitating an old lathe, choosing basic tooling for the
lathe, doing a first turning, milling with minimal equipement, basic
precision measuring with calipers, micrometers etc, basic lathe
operations, anything and everything an aspiring home metalworker might
be interested in. It would be pitched to the public television market.
If you live near middle Tennessee and would like to explore the idea
further, please let me know.
Mike Slowey
Reply to
Mike Slowey
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I spent about 10 years doing video production for a cable local origination channel (not access). I thought about the same concept a number of times, but never did run into a suitable on-air personality. Another problem is the fact that it would have to be a rather large team project with folks who have a lot of time to dedicate in order to make a weekly series. A huge amount of time just to put together the theme/topics/projects for each program, then time to scout locations since you'd want to visit commercial shops for a lot of it, more time to shoot it, post it, market it to cable companies, etc. Significant investment in time and money to get it off the ground.
Pete C.
Reply to
Pete C.
"Mike Slowey" wrote: (clip) I'm thinking of doing a metalworking video series along the lines of the New Yankee Workshop except for metalworking (clip) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ In order to do a show that is truly imitative of the Norm Abrams show, you would have to have every high end dedicated power tool known to man. Might be better to do a show patterned after the Roy Underhill show. Has there ever been a metal-working pole lathe? ;-)
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
Sorta like orange county choppers, but with skill, talent, and brains, eh?
Actually an interesting thought. Try this on for size: don't make it just studio, go out on location and visit with several different HSM types to get a feel for their shops. You can still have a 'local' project but mix in some material from a variety of viewpoints.
Antique machinery
Model making
Small business shops
Casting
Home-build NC stuff
Gunsmithing
Car/motorcycle restoration
etc.
Jim
Reply to
jim rozen
The OP's idea is too useful and educational for today's TV shows. There used to be some great how-to shows like Norm's NYW and the above mention Roy Underhill's Woodwright's Shop, a show just on router projects and techniques, a furniture show, Modern Masters which on occasions highlight welding/metalworking inspirations and few more others. Its mostly replaced with shows with high drama depicting incompatible personalities under high pressure working conditions and impossible deadlines - i.e., the new reality motorcycle and hot rod fabrication shows.
Reply to
Jack
Its mostly replaced
Thats right. The other night I was giving my son a little lathe lesson making parts for his bicycle, and he kept a running commentary going along the lines on "They've got to get this done tonight or the bike won't be finished in time for the big race etc etc." It took a minute for me to catch on, but then it occurred to me that to him, making parts in a shop always involves crazy deadlines and teetering on the brink stress- just like on TV!! So I stopped and said no, we're going slow and getting it done just right. If we're not finished tonight, oh well...
He was quite interested, though, and he really catches on quick.
Reply to
Bill Chernoff
BTW - it's Norm Abram (no "s"). I was in Home Depot once and they had signs up announcing a promotional visit by Norm. The signs had been printed as "Abrams" and they all had the "s" crossed off. LOL Bob
Reply to
Bob Engelhardt
--You might want to take this thread to Jesse James' site; he's got money, brains and a network that follows him around. He's just about through with MG; this could be his next project! :-)
jim rozen wrote: : Actually an interesting thought. Try this on for size: don't : make it just studio, go out on location and visit with several different : HSM types to get a feel for their shops. You can still have : a 'local' project but mix in some material from a variety of : viewpoints.
: Antique machinery
: Model making
: Small business shops
: Casting
: Home-build NC stuff
: Gunsmithing
: Car/motorcycle restoration
: etc.
: Jim
: -- : ================================================== : please reply to: : JRR(zero) at pkmfgvm4 (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com : ==================================================
Reply to
steamer
That'd be a great show, especially for newbies like me who's still just getting started rehabbing this old South Bend lathe.
It's tough to do. Back in the early 90s I did a show "That Darned Computer" for local cable origination. It took a huge crew all week just to get a half an hour into the can. We were really too soon though. The syndication route found no one willing to buy into the fact that anyone would watch a computer/tech oriented how-to/news show. That was about 3 years before ZDTV and CNET TV.
Tilman
Reply to
tillius
Video production is a little faster and easier now with non-linear editing being the norm. Even so, to produce a seasons worth of a weekly program would probably take a full time crew of about 20 about six months.
Pete C.
Reply to
Pete C.
"Pete C." wrote: Video production is a little faster and easier now with non-linear editing being the norm. (clip) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ What is non-linear editing?
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
Linear editing is done tape to tape, so to get to a clip, you have to move forward or backward through the tape. Non-linear editing is possible now because of advances in digital video. With non-linear editing, you can instantly move from one point in video to another in either direction and final output is usually able to be done without generational loss in quality.
Computer Generated graphics are also much easier to integrate thanks to advances in digital technology.
By the way, on That Darned Computer we did employ early linear editing technology. Even so, it still took 12 of us all week (10 hour days) to put the half hour (21 minutes) in the can.
Tillman
Reply to
tillius
Computer based editing where you can randomly access and arrange / preview segments, as opposed to the old tape based editing where you had to work in an essentially linear fashion building the final edit master and also had to sequentially search through your source tapes for the material you needed.
Pete C.
Reply to
Pete C.
Like a steenbeck table.
One step up from a moviola.
Jim
Reply to
jim rozen
You mean it doesn't! It sure feels that way to me! :)
Reply to
Dave Lyon
cut & paste/drag & drop with video (and associated audio) clips rather than text.
Reply to
Charles Spitzer
But usually lower resolution. Of course audio is easier to deal with.
Pete C.
Reply to
Pete C.
It's called humor, Mike. You need to grow a thicker skin if you're going to get along in the world of Usenet.
Reply to
Dave Hinz
You're right, I'm sure. It's only a chigger bite. Not worth the effort to scratch.
I stupidly got suckered into responding... And you stupidly got suckered into preaching about it...
Such is life.
To all who gave useful suggestions, thank you.
Reply to
Mike Slowey
I don't have a nick name, Snarl is my real, legal, name.
Might throw something, but I doubt it'd be edible .
Lighten up Mike, was just havin' some fun, albeit at your expense... 'tis life in th' fast lane of usenet man. We're *all* fair game in here and if getting a little ribbing once in awhile is too much for ya, perhaps growin' a carapice is in order?
Snarl... like I said before, good luck
Reply to
snarl

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