Best Lube for Pellet Trap?

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Hmm ... target paper feels a lot like old yellow TeleType roll paper, except perhaps a bit thicker. If you can get some rolls, cut off a few squares and try them in place of the target material and see how they do.
You might want to make a motorized roll to pull paper off a source roll, and wind it up on a destination roll, or perhaps to simply pull off a source roll, pull a known count of turns on pinch rollers, and then run a cutter across below the pinch rollers to leave a pile of perforated paper targets.
You'll need some way to protect the mechanism from stray pellets, especially the pinch rollers.
As for the printed target -- set up a slide projector with an image of a target on a slide and project it on the paper. Perhaps have a solenoid close the shutter while the paper is in transist, so you don't shoot at a stationary image on a moving paper background. :-)
To get the image to project in the right shape - take the photo of a good target from the position where the projector will sit, so the perspective distortion from the photo will cancel the perspective distortion in the projected image.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
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"DoN. Nichols" wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@Katana.d-and-d.com:
Folks are constantly trying to find a good substitute for target paper. The teletype stuff is a new idea, but may be hard to come by in quantity. Some people use cheap US targets & paint the back with dilute glue to prevent tearing. Baking or microwaving them also helps.
They used to do something like this for big matches. They had a moving "backer" that would slowly scroll behind the scoring target. They would fire 5 or 10 shots per target and use the backer to sort out if multiple shots went through the same hole. This was used for 50 meter free pistol at the Olympic level, where guys are good enough to make it an issue. Now the scoring is all done electronically, but it's filthy expensive to set up a full range. I think there are only a couple in the US with all the hardware.
Interesting ideas.
I was thinking about making something that could be produced in sufficient quantities that it could be used for matches, which requires that it handle regulation targets. Ideally, you would be able to load 62 targets (one shot per target for major competitions + 2 sighter targets) into a hopper. I need to study the innards of my laser printer to see how it picks up & feeds one sheet at a time. The targets should be simpler, in that they are thicker & stiffer. To keep the changer simple & low power, a bin on top could drop them down into firing position, and then drop them into a hopper below the pellet trap.
Doug White
Reply to
Doug White
Gunner Asch wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
The problem with a heavier plate is that it won't allow the foam backer to absorb any energy. Ideally, the plate should be as thin & light as possible so the energy goes into the foam, and not into deforming the pellet. A harder, stiffer plate should help, so stainless is a step in the right direction compared to the original galvanized steel (probably A653 or similar). If I use 410, which is easy to shear to size, I could get then it hardened. I don't mind replacing the plate (or just flipping it over before it gets too deformed) every 10 years or so.
It occurs to me that replacing the foam with "temperpedic" foam that soaks up energy better than springy foam should help a lot. A hydraulic damper system would also work well, but is a bit overkill. There is another trap someone used to make that just had light steel springs behind the plate, with no energy damping at all. They were very noisey, and tended to bounce the flattened pellets back out onto the floor.
Doug White
Reply to
Doug White
You have nice taste in air pistols.
Wes
Reply to
Wes
Wes wrote in news:Ak1Uo.266274$ snipped-for-privacy@en-nntp-07.dc.easynews.com:
Thanks. I wrestled for quite a while over the expense, but the thing is just amazingly fun to shoot. I've seen my .22 scores slowly slide over the last couple years, and with a 2 pound trigger, the Steyr is great practice. I've developed sporadic muscle spasms in my arm that will flip a shot outside of the scoring rings if it occurs at the wrong time. I've learned to put the pistol down in slow fire before it gets bad, but in sustained fire, it's a lot tougher to deal with. I'm hoping exercise & lots of shooting will make it go away.
Doug White
Reply to
Doug White
I started shooting an air pistol recently when it became apparent I'm not as steady as I used to be shooting rim fire and centerfire. I'm hoping the daily exercise also will bring improvement. I'm not shooting anything as nice as yours, just a Crosman 1377 with the steel breech kit and Williams Sight. It beats not shooting during the winter months.
I'd really like to get a IZH-46 later this year.
What do you charge yours with? Scuba tank?
Wes
Reply to
Wes
Wes wrote in news:s%6Uo.530938$ snipped-for-privacy@en-nntp-01.dc.easynews.com:
I use a Hill brand pump with the dessicant cartridge. The pistol's air cylinder lasts about three 60 - 80 shot practice sessions. When it gets low, I pump it back up AFTER a practice session. The pump is a lot of work, especially the last little bit at 3000 PSI. I consider it part of my training regimen.
The advantage of the pump (beside the exercise) is the lack of hassle with a scuba tank. No issues with refilling it, no problems with periodic hydro testing, no (minor) safety concerns having a bomb in the basement. I've had the pump almost long enough that I would had to have a tank hydrotested, at which point the small extra initial expense is paid off & then some.
Doug White
Reply to
Doug White
Do you live anywhere near a store that recycles cardboard? You're talking about trapping the pellets for the lead content, right? What if you went to the local grocery or liquor store and offered to recycle their used cardboard at no cost to them, then just shoot into a stack of cardboard; when it loads up, burn it in the fireplace, and retrieve the lead from the ash bin. :-)
Just a thought.
Keep Your Powder Dry! Rich
Reply to
Rich Grise

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