Chicom Pellet rifle rear sight needed

I was browsing through a local second hand store, and found a Chinese
(one assumes) break barrel .177 pellet gun. Interesting one...looks
a lot like a RWS 350, but without the checkering. Decent monte carlo
stock, full sized length of pull. Safety is inside the trigger guard
Strong! spring and a very loud Crack! when fired without a pellet,
moved much dirt on the floor. In very good shape. Surprisingly
comfortable to pull to shoulder and get a stock weld. Much different
than prior Chicom air guns Ive handled
Missing the rear sight.
Anyone know where to find one? Ive kinda sorta browsed the net
without finding a parts source.
Yah...I could make one from scratch...I AM a chip maker of dubious
talents..but would rather spend my time shooting it.
Anyone put a scope on their break barrel and pull the rear sight?
Interesting second hand store, lots of old tools, anvils,
blacksmithing, farming etc etc stuff.
He bought out a sword/knife dealer...lots of Chinese/fantasy/Barbarian
swords etc
I was rooting around in his backroom (we are well aquainted) and
stumbled across what I think is a Paul Chen katana. Exceptionally
well made compared to most fo the Chinese junk wall hanger swords, in
its own cardboard tube and silk sword case, with
sharpening/maintaining kit....except for that slight bend in the blade
about 18" from the tip....which I pointed out to him. Looks to be hand
forged, but not laminated, decent enough hamon but back of blade not
well executed. (Ill try to straighten it between dowel pegs this
weekend...if it breaks it was garbage anyways...shrug might make a
decent wakazasi.
So we agreed on $25 for both the sword and pellet rifle..but I
digress...
Any ideas about a rear sight?
Gunner
Reply to
Gunner
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"Gunner" wrote in message
Is it a regular dovetail rear sight? Maybe a gunsmith will have one just laying around that he took off a gun to make room for a scope mount.
Brownells?
If you break the sword make a sight out of a piece of it.
Don't know about a scope, but an aimpoint or a laser sight might be fun.
If you try a scope get one made for airguns. The unique jump of a spring piston gun supposedly does bad things to a conventional rifle scope. Something to do with how the reticule reset after a shot.
Might be a good idea to check in alt.sport.air-guns and see what those guys say.
Reply to
Bob La Londe
Nope..flat based
Hummmm!
Problem with those...pellet guns tend to have the trajectory of a pig jumping over a picket fence..so aming range tends to be short for a lazer..though there is hold over.
Thanks!!
Gunner
Reply to
Gunner
Have you tried these guys?
Beeman Precision Airguns 5454 Argosy Drive Huntington Beach, California 92649 714/890-4800 or 800/227-2744 (Orders Only) FAX 714/890-4808
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I have a Beeman R7 which I outfitted with a cheap 4x15 scope off a 22 rifle. No problems with the scope for a few thousand shots and counting. It's sighted for about 30 feet and I can consistently hit aspirins at that range. Dozens of gophers in my front yard have given their eyes to my pellets when they stuck their damn heads up out of the holes. Art
"Gunner" wrote
Reply to
Artemus
Got Chinese markings? Not seen very many without, and they were the REALLY nasty ones, very obviously low end. Don't fire it without a pellet. Plays hell with the seal, in some cases, and with the front of the piston, in others. Universally a bad thing to do to anything that you want to last.
ANY markings?
Without any markings at all, you could have just about anything, and may well have something gloatable. :-)
Bryan and Assosciates, Mac1 Airguns, Beemans. Fun Supply Airguns, Airguns of Arizona, etc. All should be able to set you up with something that'll work. Parts for the Chicom stuff are pretty cheap, but you likely have something that will work, in your gun junk. Since none of those sort of parts is "universal", yer gonna have to do a little work, unless you can find a model number and go from there.
DAGS for Chambers Gunmakers. In the UK. Scots I think. They have a selection of exploded drawings that may help ID the rifle in question. Pictures are good!
Yep. Get one rated for airguns, then you have a higher chance of it lasting for a while. The harsher recoiling springers are harder on a scope than those that are smoother, but they are all hard on scopes. The forces are ass backwards to rifle recoil and it plays hell with the adjustment mechanism inside the scope, as well as putting a walloping on the crosshair "wires".
Cheers Trevor Jones
Reply to
Trevor Jones
Gunner wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
Flat on top only or flat on top and both sides?
Many airguns, today, are flat on top with a dovetail groove on each side to take an airgun-style clamp-on scope/aimpoint/laser sight. (The dovetail runs the length of the receiver instead of perpendicular to the receiver.)
A short stop at a Wal-Mart will give you an idea of how these things attach since they carry both airguns and airgun scopes/mounts.
Reply to
RAM³
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I've bought this sight to use on CZ 452 .22cal.-
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For a $30.00 sight it is nicely made (aluminum) and works quite well as a cheap alternative to a scope.
There's plenty of other sights on there as well. You find something ya like.
Reply to
K. A. Cannon
Flat on top of the barrel. Im not a big fan of putting a optical sight on top of something not firmly attached to the tube the projectile comes out of.
Break action spring guns come to mind as one of the major cases.
That barrel gets even a bit wobbly, doesnt lock up to the receiver each and every time the same way...that optical sight is worthless
Reply to
Gunner
Ill be checking this weekend. The weekend I got it I simply stuck it in a corner and went out and sighted in the 39 Marlin that I got some months ago and had installed a Lyman peep sight on.
Shoots as well as I remembered they did.
Ayup...I blew the crosshairs on a Feinwerkbau rifle..er the crosshairs on a Nikon 4x, brand new one at that, before someone told me about the reverse recoil. Nikon gave me a new one and told me it wasnt rated for air rifle use. It now lives on my 375 H&H and has many hundreds of rounds fired.
Reply to
Gunner
Im pretty sure the receiver isnt grooved, though making a dovetail would be easy. Thanks for the link! That sight would be wonderful on a Ruger 10-22!!
Saved!
Gunner
Reply to
Gunner
The Leupold EFR (extended focal range) 4 - 9 X is the recommended scope for shocky air rifles. I have one on my Kimber .22 and plan to move it over to an airgun when I get one. The EFRs are made to withstand the peculiar recoil of air rifles and focus down to close range.
Bob Swinney
Ill be checking this weekend. The weekend I got it I simply stuck it in a corner and went out and sighted in the 39 Marlin that I got some months ago and had installed a Lyman peep sight on.
Shoots as well as I remembered they did.
Ayup...I blew the crosshairs on a Feinwerkbau rifle..er the crosshairs on a Nikon 4x, brand new one at that, before someone told me about the reverse recoil. Nikon gave me a new one and told me it wasnt rated for air rifle use. It now lives on my 375 H&H and has many hundreds of rounds fired.
Reply to
Robert Swinney
Did you get one of the ones with the micro-groove rifling, or did you get one of the good ones from before that came along? :-)
I spent a lot of time packing an early Marlin 39 around the hills of my home area!
Long barrel, peep sight on that one, too.
Too bad it was lost in a fire.
Once you have some idea of the markings, you will be able to sort out your needs pretty quick. IIRC the rear sight on most of the Chinese airguns is more a sheet metal bending job, than a machine shop job. Whacking a dovetail on so it will take a ghost ring type rear peep or a peep for a 22 would be pretty easy, though.
Cheers Trevor Jones
Reply to
Trevor Jones
That certainly sound reasonable. However, that's how the scope is mounted on my RWS. I wouldn't say that rifle gets "heavy use", but it has dispatched quite a few garden rabbits over the years. Still shoots right where I aim it, out to 150 ft or so anyway. Rifle go pop, rabbit faw down.
Reply to
Don Foreman
Gunner wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
And, yet, that's the normal attachment: the receiver instead of the barrel.
That's why the grooving is on the receiver.
By using a standard mount, an airgun scope/aimpoint is easily mounted and zeroed.
However, you might want to fabricate clamp-style mounts for a long-eye- relief (pistol) scope by bending 4 strips of metal so that the spacing is uniform, the bends match the OD of the scope barrel and the rifle barrel, and use a machine screw/wingnut combination in the middle.
That'd be the simplest way to get a mount that would meet your stated requirement.
Reply to
RAM³
Trevor Jones wrote in news:_OZ1k.1311$Gn.572 @edtnps92:
He may have minor difficulties with the pot metal that's often used for their receivers...
Reply to
RAM³
Microgroove, which for 22s is marvelous. DIdnt work so well with my 1895 45-70 and cast bullets though. Even cast Hard
Mine is the "Mounty" Irrc.
Reply to
Gunner
Not a bad idea. Though Id machine a clamp mount rather than use sheet metal
Gunner
Reply to
Gunner
Don, with a real penchant for cutting through the BS, sez:
"Rifle go pop, rabbit faw down."
Right on, Don ! That oughtta put the fly shit pepper pickers to rest.
Bob (good to "see you" again) Swinney
That certainly sound reasonable. However, that's how the scope is mounted on my RWS. I wouldn't say that rifle gets "heavy use", but it has dispatched quite a few garden rabbits over the years. Still shoots right where I aim it, out to 150 ft or so anyway.
Reply to
Robert Swinney
Gunner wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
You'll need to use a pistol-type long eye-relief scope if you go with a barrel mount.
FWIW, on the site someone else supplied (an airgun sales site) they had a clamp-on 3-track mount that may give you some ideas.
Of course, you might want to experiment with simply drilling and tapping the flat on top of the barrel to enable use of standard Weaver or Redfield bases. (You might have to grind/mill the basees' underside flat.)
Reply to
RAM³
I've seen a lot of Chinese springer airguns, and I've never yet seen one that was not made of plain old steel.
Some of the finish work was in a range between bad, and worse, but the steel was still steel.
Cheers Trevor Jones
Reply to
Trevor Jones

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