Best small lathe Grizzly or HF

Looking for best bang for the buck for a small lathe

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HF's having 20% off sales in last couple of weeks (BF and this weekend, I am sure more to follow). I have more HF equipment than I can possibly mention ... 9x20, mini- lather, X3, mini-mill etc etc. Got plenty of Grizzly stuff as well.
If you can get mini lathe locally and save a bunch, have no fear, it is the same lathe, different paint. If you get a lemon (highly unlikely), you can always return it w/o 0 hassle
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I got the "standard" small lathe at https://www.homier.com/default.asp for about $100 less than the other places have been asking for, that was about 4 years ago.
LLB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
    --With either one you're basically trying to 'polish a turd', heh. Getcher self a used Atlas instead?
--
"Steamboat Ed" Haas : Never thought I'd live to see
Hacking the Trailing Edge! : our "iron curtain" crumble...
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
steamer wrote:

I was gonna say Logan ... point being that an older used machine will cost about the same , and is much more capable than the current offshore choices .
--
Snag
every answer
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
steamer wrote:

I've had Chinese, and I've had several Atlas lathes. I'll take the Chinese.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've seen lots of good comments regarding the 12x36/40" models.
Were you trying to be vague?
--
WB
.........
metalworking projects
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Bang for the buck" can take on a hollow sound if you buy something that has serious problems or lacks the "main" feature you bought it for.
Are you price limited or are you space limited? Do you KNOW what you want it for or do you just want to run a lathe for fun? Do you want a machine that is a "project" or one that you can use "right out of the box"? If you aren't in a rush, subscrive to Home Shop Machinist or at least look in the drop box for all the articles about what people had to do to "cheap" machines to get them going. -Plastic handles -Poor fits -Missing features that you thought would be on any lathe -Lack of back gears -etc.
Tell us, if you want more input.
Not knowing the answers to the above, I implore you that if you have the space, buy as big and hefty as you can get, unless you are going to turn a lot of really small diameter stuff (like watch making), of slightly larger, where you need the higher spindle speeds and don't need the lower ones. If you really like the idea of metalworking, think of the lathe as a LONG term investment. The lathe and the mill are the only two items on earth other than house and car, that I'd ever put on credit. Cared for well, the machine tools will ba around longer than the car by a long shot, and maybe even as long as the house.
Pete Stanaitis ----------------------
RobbieW wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RobbieW wrote:

Get the 8x14 at Harbor Freight.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.