Bi-metal hacksaw blades?

Another question from an innocent who's been away from metalwork
for some time. Bi-metal obviously means two metals in the blade. One
on the edge and another for the main body? Better?
Reply to
John Ings
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High speed steel edge stays sharp longer, carbon or alloy steel back is not as likely to shatter as solid HSS is. Better. More expensive.
John Martin
Reply to
JMartin957
Where and how is it joined?
Tim
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Reply to
Tim Williams
You got it in one. Hard edge, soft(and flexible) back. My dad used to gas on and on about Atkins Silver Steel blades that he had when he was a kid working in the sulky factory and how they'd last forever and the new bimetal blades didn't last as long. They were apparently a full hardened blade because he said they'd shatter if you happened to twist the blade just a little in the cut. It's harder to do that with a bimetal blade. I think his problem with bimetal blades was that the electrical contractors he worked for bought the cheapest junk they could get to pass out to the workers. Buy some decent US-made ones, match the tooth pitch with the work and you'll have no problems.
Stan
Reply to
Stan Schaefer
Welded before the teeth are cut. The HSS usually extends only to the bottom of the gullets or a bit more.
John Martin
Reply to
JMartin957

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