bond foam rubber


packing line repair time...
My better half is trying to bond soft foam rubber to steel. She tried
gorilla glue today and it don't look good. What works best?
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
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Contact cement. You may have to use the non (low)solvent variety on some types of foam. Try a sample first.
Gorilla glue is too rigid.
Karl Townsend wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
On Wed, 27 Aug 2008 20:54:14 -0500, with neither quill nor qualm, "Karl Townsend" quickly quoth:
I bond soft foam rubber to ballistic nylon fabric with 3M Super 77 spray adhesive, which is also used to bond headliners and landau tops on cars (though they have a higher-heat version, too.)
What's her steel and how is this used? Temp extremes involved?
More info, please, Karl!
-- Smokey the Bear's rules for fire safety should apply to government: Keep it small, keep it in a confined area, and keep an eye on it. --John Stossel in _Myths, Lies, and Downright Stupidity_
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Try 3M upholstery and headliner adhesive. You can get it at just about any auto parts store.
Jim
Reply to
Jim Chandler
Clear RTV might do the trick.
Bob Swinney
Karl Townsend wrote:
Try 3M upholstery and headliner adhesive. You can get it at just about any auto parts store.
Jim ** Posted from
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**
Reply to
Robert Swinney
(I wear women's underwear!)
Reply to
Tom Gardner
He wants more information, not Too Much Information! Get it right!
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
Also 3M Super Weatherstrip Adhesive, AKA "Gorilla Snot". Available in both black and natural yellow. A thick contact adhesive made to bond foam rubber to painted or bare steel, and the glue bond usually lasts longer than the foam.
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
Thanks, everybody.
We're off to town shortly. I get tortured (dentist) while better looks for adhesives.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Now, you guys did it. I suggested to Julie to read the posts for the recommendations. She read this thread and asked "Is THAT what you do online?"
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Where else could we do it? :)
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
while we're at it, i have some rubber-ish weatherstripping in my car sealing the back hatch. at the corners, it's glued together rather than being a single piece. replacement is in the $400 range so i'd like to try to glue it back together. it's not torn anywhere.
any ideas what would work?
regards, charlie
Reply to
charlie
If the Auto Parts can find the generic bulk weatherstrip profile that matches the car, you can order a full roll of the foam. The corners, you clip a wedge out of the inside of the curve, apply a dab of black Gorilla Snot, let dry, stick together.
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is one source.
You can also get the 'plastic barb fasteners every six inches' foam in bulk too (Sixties GM products among others) but you might have to stick it in the holes and make the miter splice in place. (The "factory" has a jig to locate the molded corners.)
When you get back to where you started, you can either make a butt splice or a 45-degree scarfed splice.
Dust the contact areas of glue line with a bit of talc or chalk so it doesn't stick to the door frame till it's well and truly set.
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
It's Larry's fault, he just brings out the worst in me! ...he brings out the worst in EVERYBODY!
Reply to
Tom Gardner
On Thu, 28 Aug 2008 00:23:09 -0400, with neither quill nor qualm, "Tom Gardner" quickly quoth:
You glue foamy rubber underpants to your steely balls, do you, you silly lezbo? TOO MUCH INFO!
(I asked for more info, not too much.)
-- Smokey the Bear's rules for fire safety should apply to government: Keep it small, keep it in a confined area, and keep an eye on it. --John Stossel in _Myths, Lies, and Downright Stupidity_
Reply to
Larry Jaques
On Thu, 28 Aug 2008 06:33:56 -0500, with neither quill nor qualm, "Karl Townsend" quickly quoth:
Bwahahahaha! Now how do you 'splain the little lesbian Tawmboy and still save face with her?
I'm sure glad my coffee wasn't out of the microwave yet when I read that.
-- Smokey the Bear's rules for fire safety should apply to government: Keep it small, keep it in a confined area, and keep an eye on it. --John Stossel in _Myths, Lies, and Downright Stupidity_
Reply to
Larry Jaques
On Thu, 28 Aug 2008 19:38:36 -0400, with neither quill nor qualm, "Tom Gardner" quickly quoth:
WELL! You beeeyatch!
-- Smokey the Bear's rules for fire safety should apply to government: Keep it small, keep it in a confined area, and keep an eye on it. --John Stossel in _Myths, Lies, and Downright Stupidity_
Reply to
Larry Jaques
That stuff is good for about a year, after which the bond fails. JR Dweller in the cellar
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Reply to
JR North
Suggest Weldwood Contact Cement, in the pint cans at Home Despot. Good stuff. JR Dweller in the cellar
-------------------------------------------------------------- Home Page:
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If you're not the lead dog, the view never changes Doubt yourself, and the real world will eat you alive The world doesn't revolve around you, it revolves around me No skeletons in the closet; just decomposing corpses -------------------------------------------------------------- Dependence is Vulnerability: -------------------------------------------------------------- "Open the Pod Bay Doors please, Hal" "I'm sorry, Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that.."
Reply to
JR North
On Thu, 28 Aug 2008 19:31:28 -0700, with neither quill nor qualm, JR North quickly quoth:
--topposting corrected, ya lazy bastid--
Au contraire, mon capitan. I spray both sides, allow the stuff to tack off, and then adhere, applying weight overnight for my glare guards, since they're to be flexible. I haven't had a failure from delamination since I started that, and I have decade-old sample glare guards which are still hanging in there nicely. None shows any sign of delamination. It's really good shit, Maynard.
If you've had failures, it's likely due to either a lack of consistent adhesive thickness (light spray), improper application, or a bad foam.
-- Smokey the Bear's rules for fire safety should apply to government: Keep it small, keep it in a confined area, and keep an eye on it. --John Stossel in _Myths, Lies, and Downright Stupidity_
Reply to
Larry Jaques

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