Brass/Bronze Castings Needed

I am looking for someone who would be interested in casting 20
miniature copies of a shape similar to that shown in the bottom left
hand picture of
formatting link

Material can be any kind of bronze or brass alloy. Approximate size is
7" long by 2 1/2" wide by 1 1/2" deep. Surface can be rough. Can be
cast in multiple parts if that makes things easier (and cheaper :-))
I'll do the pattern to your specs. I can make wax masters if need be.
This is a keel bulb for a model sailboat to be used in a youth building
and sailing class. Normally these things are made of lead, but
(rational or not) there's no way you can come within a mile of exposing
kids to lead in a class these days.
Anyhow, if you're interested, email me at boebert [at] swcp.com and we
can get into more detail.
Cheers,
Earl
Reply to
Earl
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You might consider casting them of ZA-12. It's a zinc-aluminum alloy, a variant of white metal or Zamac.
It is heavy enough for the purpose, and it's inexpensive. Best of all it melts at a relatively low temperature, so you could even do the casting yourself, if not with student participation in the casting, then as a demo from a safe distance.
An old style hotplate with a stove element, some firebricks and a stainless steel pot from the Salvation Army store (St. Vincent de Paul, Goodwill, whatever), and you're in the melting game.
Green sand is cheap, petrobond less so but also less hassle to keep properly tempered.
The going rate at the supplier last time I checked was near $6 a pound for B Bronze ingots. ZA 12 is much cheaper.
Food for thought, anyway. Maybe.
Cheers Trevor Jones
Reply to
Trevor Jones
And lots of automobile parts like carb bodies and lamp assemblies used to be made out of Zamac. A field trip to an automobile "recycler" might prove enlightening.
Jeff
Reply to
Jeff Wisnia
So are all of the important components on the Atlas-Craftsman lathes. You know, the parts that aren't supposed to break when you are taking a heavy cut... Maybe someone has some old gears that they want to melt down.
ww88 (Who is on the Atlas-Craftsman yahoo group and has heard of a dozen different ways to fix broken Zamac parts)
Reply to
woodworker88
They are pretty dirty sources though, in respect to the amount of crud you have to deal with to get a pound of clean metal.
Easier to scrounge or buy some big zinc anodes from a corrossion control outfit, and dissolve your own aluminim into it.
ZA-12 is 12 percent aluminum, ZA-25, a common die casting alloy, is 25 percent.
Cheers Trevor Jones
Reply to
Trevor Jones
That's why I'm saving the gear train on the Sears/Atlas I scrapped out. Now I just need something fun to cast. Karl
woodworker88 wrote:
Reply to
kfvorwerk
Karl, If any of those gears have any life left in them at all, they are worth way more if sold on ebay, than they are as melt stock.
Zinc is pretty cheap to buy, Atlas gears are not!
Worth looking at.
Cheers Trevor Jones
Reply to
Trevor Jones
No,no,no. I just parted out a 10" Atlas. The change gears brought about $180 on eBay (15 gears, sold individually). A 44 tooth one sold for $34. Those gears aren't Zamac, they're gold.
Unless yours are busted.
Bob
Reply to
Bob Engelhardt
Now I've got to figure out where they are. Some were busted some good. I think I've got the headstock and tailstock laying around somewhere. Are they worth anything? It was a small lathe about 4 feet long. I live in Hawaii so shipping heavy stuff is expensive but gears are light. Thanks Karl
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
Reply to
kfvorwerk

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