Bridgeport dimension

What's the height from the floor to the top of the ram on a Bridgeport J / 2J vertical mill?
Reason I'm asking is to try and determine if a Harbor Freight shop
crane (2 ton) has enough height / reach to slide under the end of a trailer and lift it up off of the trailer. The other alternative is to slide it down a ramp of some sort with a comealong winching it down. I'm not thrilled about sliding a top heavy item with a narrow base down a ramp.
RWL
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On 2008-10-04, GeoLane at PTD dot NET <GeoLane> wrote:

download the manual from my site
http://igor.chudov.com/manuals/Bridgeport/

Absolutely NOT. Not by far. I own both a bridgy and the crane. The crane is indispensable, but cannot even approach a Bridgy.

You can make it a lot less top heavy, and bolt to a makeshift pallet.
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On Fri, 03 Oct 2008 20:35:36 -0500, Ignoramus26581

Thanks, but not in the manual I need. The round ram one has the dimension to the middle of the round ram as 54", but the manual for the J head model doesn't have a dimension for the ram height at all. I did some crude measurements on the J head drawing and assuming that things are to scale it should be around 59-60", but I don't know if that's close enough. I'm going down to Harbor Freight tomorrow AM, hopefully to buy the 2T shop crane. I need to add BP ram height to trailer deck height to see if the crane's boom can lift it. Can one of you guys measure your Bridgie and post it?
RWL
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GeoLane at PTD dot NET writes:

60 inches from floor to top of ram (that is, where the 5/8-11 lifting eye goes). This is the J head model, aka 1J, not the newer 2J or older M head.
Suggest you get some 10 ft sections of SuperStrut from Home Depot, and C- clamp them across the hoist legs, as outriggers to provide some backup stability. Just might save your bacon if she decides to tip. Your sturdy, rigid little hoist will start to feel like it's made of springy fishing rods once you load it up with 2000 lbs of Bridgeport.
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On Sat, 04 Oct 2008 02:11:21 -0500, Richard J Kinch

Is there another name for SuperStrut. I looked also for Unistrut at the home depot web site but couldn't find any listing for it. Any place besides Home Depot to look for this sort of steel?
Outriggers might have made things do-able if I'd had them last Thursday when I brought the Bridgie home. The crane was sitting on level dirt, but it was uneven enough that it tilted slighly to one side when we were picking up the BP, so in the end I had to get the neighbor to bring over his Bobcat and lift it off for me.
Lots of little things need to be fixed on this machine, so I'll be posting a bunch of questions.
Hoping to get the TECO VFD set up on Tuesday.
RWL
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On Sun, 19 Oct 2008 21:16:18 -0400, GeoLane at PTD dot NET <GeoLane at PTD dot NET> wrote:

Electrical supply house. Most sell to the public.
Wes
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<GeoLane at PTD dot NET> wrote in message wrote:

Don't waste your time at the Home Depot web site. It's in the electrical aisle at the stores....
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On Sun, 19 Oct 2008 21:16:18 -0400, the infamous GeoLane at PTD dot NET <GeoLane at PTD dot NET> scrawled the following:

I bought some 1-5/8" square Unistrut at HD last year, when I bought my truck. I cut it and used it in place of the $165 (through Toyota) bed rail system. Cost: $20 for a 10' stick, $20 more for some t-nuts, bolts, & pipe clamps. The low-profile stuff (1-5/8" x 13/16", no holes) was $15/stick.
They don't show it online, but it's in the electrical section. Sparkies use it for hanging conduit. (Right, Bruce?)
If you can't find it at your local HD, call some of the electrical supply houses (Platt Electric Supply up here in PNW) for it. It'll be $35-44 a stick, but you'll find it. What a crock!
Cheaper source, plus (outrageous?) shipping fees <http://www.idealtruevalue.com/servlet/the-U-cln-Unistrut-Electrical-Raceway/Categories

Hey, nice neighbors!
-- "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it whether it exists or not, diagnosing it incorrectly, and applying the wrong remedy." -- Ernest Benn
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I measured the two short pieces I have in the shop. They're 1-5/8. Pretty strong stuff, but I was wondering if they had larger sizes. What I was thinking of doing was putting it inside the legs of the shop crane, extended out maybe 6" and then with a screw type foot that could be used to level the crane on soft or uneven surfaces.

Yeah. He is a nice guy. I paid his son in law to move some trees for me with the Bobcat last spring. I offered to pay him when he lifted the Bridgeport off the trailer but he declined. I think he was just amused at what I was hauling into my cellar.
Thanks to all of you who answered my question.
RWL
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On Mon, 20 Oct 2008 19:37:54 -0700, Gunner Asch

It will be called a multitude of things depending on who made it, usually with 'strut' in the name. Trademarks, dont'cha know... ;-)
McMaster: Strut Channel. They aren't giving it away, but it's the good stuff. (Though you'll need the rubber hoses and bamboo slivers to get the supplier name out of them without just ordering some...)

Yeah, but is that the good stuff? Or coming out of the Glorious Peoples Republic Steel Foundry and Rice Noodle Factory in Shanghai? (And it suspiciously bends like a noodle under stress...)
You might not want Mr. Electrical Inspector to try a chin-up using a length of the fake strut as the exercise bar - after he gets out of the hospital... He's gonna come back and pick the place apart with a microscope, and he'll bring all his inspector buddies from the other specialties. Talk about 'proctologically violated'...
Nobody Pays Full Retail in Los Angeles unless they are either brain dead or terminally lazy, or in a severe time bind. All the warehouses are here. In a small town I can see $35 plus for what we get for $20, just for shipping and stocking.
--<< Bruce >>--
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On Tue, 21 Oct 2008 13:05:03 -0700, Gunner Asch

One of my Dad's favorite stories concerned the time when he worked as plant electrician in a war production facility. If the 300 lb. maintenance chief couldn't pull it off the wall, a conduit was adequately fastened. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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I missed the Staff meeting, but the Memos showed that Gunner Asch
in rec.crafts.metalworking :

    That's what Liberals pay. They don't want anyone to think them guilty of exploitation of the children in their sweatshops.

    Yeah.
pyotr
-- pyotr filipivich "I had just been through hell and must have looked like death warmed over walking into the saloon, because when I asked the bartender whether they served zombies he said, Sure, what'll you have?'" from I Hear America Swinging by Peter DeVries
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Good idea, I will use it for the frame to make a generator enclosure.
i

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Ignoramus24384 wrote:

><http://www.idealtruevalue.com/servlet/the-U-cln-Unistrut-Electrical-Raceway/Categories
You can do that, and it might be worthwhile if you expect it to be temporary and then recycle the components. The Unistrut, angle brackets, bolts and nuts will get pretty expensive. Buy a few sticks of regular square steel tubing, 1" is probably fine, and just weld up a nice rigid frame.
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Ignoramus24384 writes:

If you mean an air-cooled gasoline-powered generator, that's not possible. Any enclosure that keeps in sound will keep in heat.
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I mean a liquid cooled diesel generator. The main purpose of rthe enclosure will be to keep elements away, sound muffling will be secondary, as this generator is not too loud.
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Ignoramus24384 writes:

OK, that's quite feasible.
I just happen to live in a land of annual hurricanes, and shake my head at every case of people trying to "improve" cheap generators.
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I tried that and arrived to the same sentiment as you. Trying to make a cheap generator into an expensive generator is more expensive than buying an expensive generator outright. Mine is 20 kW, with under 200 hours on the meter. I bought it used. I want to keep it clean, dry and safe from any environmental effects.
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On Tue, 21 Oct 2008 22:21:40 -0500, Ignoramus24384

That's why you make the cover frame from mild steel tubing, cover it with heavy sheet metal and seam it weathertight, make inner cover panels from sheet aluminum, put fiberglass batt insulation in between and rivet the inner panels on.
With Strut you are paying a lot extra for that slot, if you won't need to change it once finished why pay for a never needed feature?
I'm going to make up a pipe and conduit rack cart, and use Strut for the uprights and material storage crossarms so they can be adjusted later. But the rest of the frame will be recycled light poles or mild tubing, since the frame will never need to be changed or adjusted.
--<< Bruce >>--
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On Thu, 23 Oct 2008 19:13:12 -0700 (PDT), Too_Many_Tools

I've seen many local news stories from that region where they put their generator outside chained to a big tree - but the thieves have bigger bolt cutters, and/or a bigger gun.
They get another, but this time try to rig up an extension on the exhaust pipe so they can have the generator locked up inside the house and run the exhaust out the window - but the whole family gets nailed by the CO because their plumbing job was horrible.
Or the radiant heat from the exhaust lights the window frame or the curtains on fire, and there goes the house.
--<< Bruce >>--
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