Chain link fencing?

This seems on topic, though perhaps just inside the boundaries:
How is chain link fencing manufactured? I've been trying to imagine the
machinery they use, and I've tried poking around with Google to find out.
Thanks!
-- M. Powell
Reply to
M Powell
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I'd like to see how they make chiken wire myself. I can see how they make chinlink. Have a die that stamps or forms a coil of wire into the continuous zzzzzzzzzzzz's, cut to lenght. ANother machine that turns these pieces into each other forming a woven interlocking fence.
But how do they form the twists on chicken wire at all those connections is what I would like to know.
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Reply to
Roy
Chicken wire is woven with the spools doing turns around each other. Just a big ol' machine doing one simple little chore for a long time. Check the way that things are wound and you can then see the paths that the individual rolls of wire have to go.
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Reply to
Bob May
Right down my alley
There is a fixed die that is threaded on the inside to match the pitch and diameter of the outside of each picket of chain link fencing to be made. Within this fixed die is a spinning blade that matches the inside profile of the fence picket (look down the end of the fence picket and you'll see the shape). After the die is threaded, the blade spins at about 1000 rpm and a fence picket is spit out the other end (the whole die section is about 6 inches long). The pickets are cut automatically using a pneumatic shear.
And it gets more complicated....as one picket is spit out, it automatically winds itself into an existing picket. this forms a continuous fence which is automatically rolled. Also, after the pickets are wound together the wire ends are treated before rolling. This treatment may be twisting and left pointed for security (ouch to climb over) or bent over....again, the edge is done automatically.
It's a little more complicated than this as the pickets that are formed need to lay flat when finished rather than having a twist, and stuff like that. in practice, the forming machines are effectively CNC spindle formers.
We make miles of similar stuff each year. Only ours tends to have an opening of .1" rather than 2" and is used for conveyors.
Koz
M Powell wrote:
Reply to
Koz
Most chain link fencing contractors of any size purchase raw wire and make the fabric on site. My local supplier has a unit in his yard under an overhang but I have never seen it in operation. I have wished that I had access to that yard when it was running but I have not lucked out so far. Randy
Reply to
Randy Zimmerman
So, how big is this machine?
Reply to
M Powell
I don't guess you've got photos?
Reply to
M Powell
Sorry was out of town and should have posted this link in my first reply.
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Bergandi is about the opnly US manufacturer left of chain link weaving machines. I didn't delve deeper into the site to see if there was more detailed information but at least there is a photo.
Koz
M Powell wrote:
Reply to
Koz

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