Compressor drain

Looking for recommendations on a good compressor drain. Something that
works, does not need attention, tolerates occasional cold winter day
with garage door open, and does not make too much noise. McMaster's
4919K13 seems to fit the bill?
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Reply to
Ignoramus19021
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I don't know about the McMaster part but I 've installed several auto drains from Harbor freight with good results, 2 of them in use for over 2 yrs w/ no problems. The cost was less then $15 as I remember. Simple to install, they actuate off the unloader, you may want to use your own tubing and fittings for the install.
YMMV
Andrew
Reply to
AndrewV
Second that on the fittings. The tubing and fittings supplied with the kit blew out and leaked on first use. Otherwise it seems to work ok but does leak a little air all of the time.
Reply to
Ray Spinhirne
Does not sound very encouraging. I want something that does not leak, as I leak-proofed my tank enough so that if the outlet is closed, it would run only once a week.
Anyway, these things need to be connected to the unloader valve, right? My unloader tubing is copper.
Reply to
Ignoramus27719
Hey Iggy,
If you decide NOT to go the economical route, then maybe you'd like what I have.
I have a job specific device made by Burkert, consisting of a blow-down valve with an accessory digital timer. I have mine set to blow down for ten seconds any time power is applied to the compressor controls, and again for 10 seconds every 6 hours that power is applied. That is often enough that I never see any actual moisture when it discharges.
Cost about 150 bucks.
Zero leakage, by the way.
If you are interested at that kind of money, lemme know and I'll get the product info for you. I'm sure there is a distributor in your area.
Brian Lawson, Bothwell, Ontario.
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Reply to
Brian Lawson
I think that it is the most idiot proof way of draining the tank. I looked at their site a little, would be nice to know what model number you have.
Other alternatives that I can get one are ones with a float, or else one that operates off the unloaded valve.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus27719
Iggy,
Go here and build your own, use the design a CDV assembly link. I have one on a 5HP Quincy 1/2 NTP in and out, 10 sec on every 45 minutes. I would prefer to have the one that stayed off for up to 4 hrs. but this one came with the compressor. As Brian said, keeps the tank free of condensate.
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Unless you have a air dryer you will still get some condensate down stream in you distribution piping so be sure to put in some valves to drain your pipe syetem.
HTH
Von
Ignoramus27719 wrote in news:zIidnVjgN8qdCv_VnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@giganews.com:
Reply to
Von Pearsall
OK, that's a good start. I can tie this valve to the power supplied to my motor, that way it will come up when the motor is powered but not at random moments. I will report what I will end up doing.
My requirements are, not too loud, preferably not to come up without the motor running, survive occasional freezing weather (garage in Illinois).
i
Reply to
Ignoramus27719
Hey again Iggy,
OK. The Burkert I have is about 10 years old, and mine is a Type 1078-1. Apparently there have been some minor style changes, and the "new" one is a Type 1078-2. You can see that at:
and look at the PDF there. This mounts to an (as shown) solenoid valve, like a Type 0330
If you are still interested, and you'd like to lemme know what city you are in, I'll try to find a dealer/distributor closest to you.
Take care.
Brian Lawson. XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Reply to
Brian Lawson
the only good thing I can say about that harbor freight autodrain is that I was able to get a full refund when I returned it. I installed it, it did not seal, the air pressure (160 PSI) blew the O-rings right through the seals, the plastic tubing was a real problem to connect to the compressor, I had to make a fitting for it - all in all, worthless, but cheap - might be OK on a homeowner type compressor that shuts off at a much lower pressure - my problems were due to the design of the device, not to a particular defective device. suggest you avoid it
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Reply to
William Noble
Brian, I will look at that and also, will measure the space under the bottom end of my compressor. Thanks a lot. I do not mind spending $150 IF that gets me exactly what I want, which is a relatively quiet package that is reliable and works in hot as well as in freezing weather. (or at least does not crack from freezing, and could continue draining later when the water thaws)
i
Reply to
Ignoramus27719
Hey once again Iggy,
OK. Lemme know if I can help. I can take a pix of how mine is installed if it would help, but it is very simple. My compressor is a vertical style tank, and the valve is simply hung on the end of the pre-existing 1/4" drain pipe that comes out horizontally from the lowest point on the bottom to the side of the tank by the "feet". This means that the bottom of the Burkert drain valve body proper is only about 1/2" lower than the horizontal run of the 1/4" pipe. Lots of "head-room" so to speak.
Take care.
Brian Lawson. XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
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Reply to
Brian Lawson
Thank you. I looked under the tank yesterday (also vertical) and I think that I have enough clearance for a valve with timer.
I also have a 300 PSI Asco valve, and some timer and delay relays. So with just a little wiring, I could wire it so that it fires every time the motor stops. Or, perhaps, every day or so. I want to be done with it so that it will work forever, not requiring any more changes.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus5512
recommendations on a good compressor drain. Something that
I put an HF drain unit on my Quincy Compressor last week. It only seems to work on intial startup, and not on shutdown when the system reaches full pressure and the unloader opens. This compressor is set to shut of at 175psi and come on at 135psi. If I manually shut the compressor off at less than 135 psi., the HF drain seems to work. I'm thinking of putting in a stiffer spring in the HF valve to see if it will then operate at the higher pressures..Either way at least I get draining occuring on intial startup when the tank pressure is less than 135psi., so for $8 bucks it's probably worth it. I ditched the HF fittings/hose from the kit and used Swagelok fittings..
Reply to
oldjag
I wouldn't depend on the HF drain at that pressure - my quincy is set to 160 psi - the HF drain device failed immediately - the pressure blew the o-rings through the drain - suggest you don't use it
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Reply to
William Noble
Bendix makes this valve for use on truck air brake tanks:
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The MV-2 uses fluctuating tank pressure to expel water. The chamber of the valve fills with water from the bottom of the tank, through a diaphragm-type check valve, and when tank pressure falls the diaphragm shuts off the tank input and the chamber's pressure lifts a drain valve, letting that pressure drive the water out. It wouldn't work for larger tanks in humid areas chamber is too small) but for smaller compressors it's fine, as long as the pressure varies enough between cut-out and cut-in. Trucks typically run between 105-125 psi. There's a heated version for cold weather, but it'll use battery voltage, not so handy in the shop.
Dan
Reply to
Dan_Thomas_nospam

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