Cutting "square" holes in sheet metal?

How would I go about cutting small 1/4 inch square holes in 10 gauge sheet sheet metal?

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How would I go about cutting small 1/4 inch square holes in 10 gauge sheet sheet metal?
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

If I had to do 2 or 3 holes, I'd drill them undersize and file them. If I had to do hundreds and hundreds, I'd invest in a square hole punch and die for a Whitney hand punch. In between? ..
GWE
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Grant Erwin wrote:

A Whitney hand punch for 10 gauge!?!?!
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    And keeping a square punch and die aligned? I've only seen round punches for the Whitney. (Though I would be glad to learn of the ability to do square and other shapes.)
    In the meanwhile -- what *I* would use would be a 1/4" square broach -- which I already have. However, note that the pilot hole is a little over 1/4" for that, so the sides of the hole will have a slight scallop on each side. I would use an arbor press to drive the broach, and would use a drill press to make the pilot holes, unless the location was quite critical.
    Good Luck,         DoN.
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Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
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A Roper Whitney No.8 will do it.
Kelley
On Wed, 02 Nov 2005 21:44:43 -0500, Stephen Young

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Kelley Mascher wrote:

When I read "hand punch" I envision a No. 5 Jr or the XX. These you can use with 1 hand. The No.8 needs 2 hands or a bench mounting device or something similar to use 1 hand.

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How would I go about cutting small 1/4 inch square holes in 10 gauge sheet sheet metal?
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

If you don't need a lot of them drill 1/4" hole and square out the corners with a file.
Otherwise you should be able to get a sheet metal punch.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

You would be surprised how a little practice with a file makes pretty nice holes. If you don't trust yourself drill the corners first so they come out square and lined up
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How many and how accurate? For just a few, drill a hole and use a triangular file. 10 ga is .134" IIRC, that will take a serious punch and die set to do a series of them, about 3-1/2 tons of die pressure.
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Well, I'm glad you aren't trying to cut *large* 1/4 inch square holes, they're pretty difficult to do right.
But the small ones are easy, just get retro and pick up a 1/4" square drill from:
WATTS BROS TOOL WORKS, INC. 760 AIRBRAKE AVE. PO BOX 335 WILMERDING, PA. 15148 phone, 412-823-7877
The company is so retro themselves that I don't believe they are bothered about not having a web presence yet, or if they have one it's pretty well hidden.
For any folks who think I'm "smoking the drapes" about the square drill thing, there's a photo description of a polygon drill at:
http://www.integerspin.co.uk/polygon.htm
IIRC these were the drills that made the carriage bolt what it is today.
Jeff (Ducking.....)
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Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
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And duck you should, Jeff!
Bob Swinney
wrote:

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Thanx for the pointer to "Make" magazine. I subscribed.
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Load a 12ga. with pieces of 1/4" key stock
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A pyramidal broach? Ie, take a 1/4" sq. broach, taper it a little (might need a grinding house to do this right), drill a 1/4 or 15/64 hole, and broach away, proly doable on a BP or a drill press.
Greenfield makes a "knockout punch set" for electricians, where you drill a 3/8 or 1/2" starter hole, and thread the male/female halves of a threaded ball-bearing punch set on either side, and ratchet out your desired pipe opening--over 2" in many cases. Maybe you can locate this style of punch for small square holes, altho you are dealing w/ a substantial thickness for that dimension.
Very fine O/A might could do it also. You can get amazingly smooth cuts w/ O/A, esp. if you get the heat right, and it kind self-rounds the edges--if you desire. Or it can leave them quite sharp. You'll need some kind of fixturing guide, for height and dimension. Will take some practice, also.
The 12 ga shotgun suggestion may just be a good bet! ---------------------------- Mr. P.V.'d formerly Droll Troll

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On Thu, 03 Nov, Nick Carter and Felice Luftschein wrote:

And for those unaware, Make is just about the best single magazine *ever*.
Subscribe. You'll be happy you did.
--Donnie
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Donnie Barnes http://www.donniebarnes.com 879. V.

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