Damaged Aluminum Rims

I just purchased aluminum rims that were damaged on the lip.
Would it be possible to weld a lip back on it? The chip is not that big,
about half an inch. There's also a few small dents on another rim.
I will get a pic tomorrow.
I'm currently in school doing a year Welding course. I may get my
instructor to help me with the aluminum welding.
I thought about bringing the rims to a place that fixes rims, but that could
get expensive.
Thanks,
Steve
Reply to
VW Golf Cart
Loading thread data ...
"VW Golf Cart" wrote: I just purchased aluminum rims that were damaged on the lip. Would it be possible to weld a lip back on it? (clip) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ I did that once on an aluminum drive pulley to a Judson supercharger, and I'm not even that good a welder. But next to my office was a machine shop full of friends. After you weld, chances are you will need to mount the wheels on a lathe and trim off the excess weld bead. That could cost you more than the welding, if you have to pay to have it done.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
Don't do it, it's very dangerous.
Reply to
Derek
LOL, what is dangerous? And why?
Steve
Reply to
VW Golf Cart
VW Golf Cart wrote in article ...
Obviously, you've never seen the result of a damaged wheel flange letting go under pressure.
There are people in this world who are now known as "Lefty" due to a damaged/poorly repaired wheel exploding as it was being inflated....
There are also people who have left this world for the same reason..
Reply to
Bob Paulin
Hmm, never looked at it from that point of view. Maybe I should consult the professionals. Thanks, Steve
Reply to
VW Golf Cart
might just put it on the car (sans tire) after it's welded and use jack stand w/steady handed small grinder for the "finish": cheapcheap
Reply to
the dog barked and
If this lip is the part of the rim which holds the tire on then welding may weaken the aluminum at the heat affected zone. The rim may then fail at speed while you are driving. This may then cause the tire to come off. If it was for a car I wouldn't do it. A golf cart though would be fine. But maybe it can be weld repaired and nothing will happen. I guess it's up to you. ERS
Reply to
Eric R Snow
Bob has got a point. Even though most of the hazard is in truck split rims letting go, there is still a hell of a lot of force stored inside a car tire and rim. I wouldn't try welding on one either - a new rim is cheaper than the hospital bills.
Google on wheel rim separation explosion and you'll get a whole pile of dead and seriously injured people. Hell, there have been people killed with a wheelbarrow tire & rim exploding, let alone a car tire.
-->--
Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
Greetings and Salutations... Yea...it is amazing how dangrous that pressurized doughnut can be. I remember a woman who went to one of our mission churches for a bit, whose husband had gone through a LOT of reconstructive surgery when the tire he was re-inflating at a gasoline station blew up in his face. Peeled a LOT of his face right off... And isn't THAT a pleasant picture to have in your head? Made ME real cautious about where I put myself when inflating the tires ever since. Regards Dave Mundt
Reply to
Dave Mundt
I think you might be surprised at how many professionals there are on this forum.
Orrin
Reply to
Orrin Iseminger
"Orrin Iseminger" wrote: I think you might be surprised at how many professionals there are on this forum. ^^^^^^^^^^^^ Yeah, but how many of them are called "Lefty."
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
In Ontario it is illegal! the car could be impounded, and the rims should never pass a safety ( I wouldn't sign a safety on it!) Pat
Reply to
Pat Ford
I'm a licenced mechanic ontario cert#'s: 310s212447 310a212447 and interprovincial ( Canada wide ) 693169
Guess that qualifies me as a professional Pat
Reply to
Pat Ford
Pat, I understand that in Canada, you must be licensed to work on any rotating part of a wheel/tire. Is this correct. If so can you point me to the language of the law. I think it is time we consider that in the States. Particularly in light of several runaway truck wheels.
ASE Master Automobile Tech (retired)
Reply to
Andy Asberry
You would never know!!!
Steve
Reply to
VW Golf Cart
Not qute true, Pat. A PROPERLY repaired rim would get past you with no problem, as the repair would be completely invisible. Cosmetic repairs are done on a fairly regular basis by several fairly reputable wheel restoring companies. If the actual bead retaining lip of the wheel is damaged, I agree - no way to fix it "properly" but curb rash and chipped outer rim edges (where the balance weights clip on) can be repaired safely and legally
Clare Snyder 310A 063844 IP # 009276
Reply to
nospam.clare.nce
There are many reasons why a car may be required to undergo a safety inspection, one of which may be the neighbourhood vigilante who you reported for a wild party and tossed bottles when their son celebrated his girlfriends loss of virtue when they weren't home three years ago. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller
As I understand it, in Ontario ( a province, sort the same as a state), any work done for trade is supposed to be under the supervision of a licensed trades person. I have a class A license for both cars and heavy trucks, that allows me to do anything, then there are "lower" classes B for body, c for brakes ( like speedy muffler shops)...
there are some details at
formatting link
Pat
Reply to
Pat Ford

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.