disolved my pocket knife

I lost my regular pocket knife :( I've had a knife in my pocket for 50
years now, feel naked without it. There was an old swiss army knife in
the everything drawer. None of the blades would open unless you
grabbed them with a needle nose vise grip. So, I opened everything
half way and tossed the knife in dilute phosphoric acid and left it
overnight.
this morning it was more than loose. All the blades were floppy and
the retaining springs had come out. Don't soak your knife in acid.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
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I did a major cleaning and soaked some neglected tools in ATF. Loosened them all up nicely.
Reply to
ATP
I buy small pieces of aluminum from a shop in NC. Its substantially cheaper than buying stock locally even after freight, and they are already precut to the length I want. Anyway, I opened a box of aluminum rod the other day and found an old beat up wooden handle knife in there. The kind I used to call an electricians knife when I was a kid. One regular round tip blade and one locking blade with an end squared off to make common screwdriver. I asked them if somebody was missing their baby. They told me to keep the knife and thanks for the business. So Karl. Were you over at Stock Car Steel a couple weeks ago? LOL.

Reply to
Bob La Londe
I've received strange extra presents in McMaster-Carr deliveries, as if they were disappearing stuff that doesn't sell.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
"Jim Wilkins" fired this volley in news:jne0e2$puc $ snipped-for-privacy@dont-email.me:
Once upon a long while ago, I bought one of the little 4x6 horizontal band saws from MSC.
Within two weeks, all the smoke escaped from the motor. So I called, and the next day on UPS came my box.
It was kind of heavy... inside were THREE motors!
Hmmm... called 'em back and explained. The guy was really nice, and said, "They're not worth shipping back. Just keep the other two; you'll need them!"
That was over 15 years ago. I still am working on the second of those three -- third is still in the box!
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Are they the non-UL motors?
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
"Jim Wilkins" fired this volley in news:jne29k$4rg$1 @dont-email.me:
Non-UL, non-thermally protected, rated at twice what they'll actually put out, aluminum windings.... typical Chinese crap.
But the third motor I installed has been running for over 12 years.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
"ATP" on Thu, 26 Apr 2012 21:50:06 -0400 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
Thanks for the tip, both of you. I have some like that, myself >
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" on Fri, 27 Apr 2012 08:49:44 -0500 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:
I worked on a car like that. "Fleet" vehicle, engine made way to much noise, but it ran. My boss, John finally got desperate, and had it issued to Niles. Great guy Niles, but not the best at ... err, monitoring vehicles. We expected the car to get towed in with a dead engine. It never did. Finally, John had it brought in for "a regular check up" and pulled the engine anyway. VW engines are not suppose to go 150 000 km without trouble.
tschus pyotr
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
I found one a while back...it had been misplaced for several years..
Sorry to hear that--I also ALWAYS carry a knife and so I know exactly how you feel...
I carry an old-timer #340T--no other knife will do..
And since the newer "made in China" "old timers" are totally out of the question, "losing one" can be rather disruptive...
Occasionally, they do pop up on Ebay as NOS and at antique stores though, and so these days I actually have a couple of spares stashed in my nightstand.
Don't set your electronic calipers onto a ketone soaked rag, either.
The black molded plastic reader-head is oddly misshaped, but fortunately, the lcd window is still (mostly) clear.
Reply to
PrecisionmachinisT
Sad to hear that. I can imagine what it's like to misplace a pocket knife. Hope it returns soon.
I had a cheapie Swiss, years ago, much the same problem. Someone suggested pack the end with polishing compound, and repeatedly open the blades. Might have worked. Being decades older now, I'd reach for some spray oil. Or buy another knife.
My daily use knife is a Stanley SM -18 that I got from Home Depot, three bucks. In the tool crib along the wall with screw drviers, and crescent wrenches. I've resharpened it many times. The pocket clip is perfect for shirt pocket carry.
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Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus
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I lost my regular pocket knife :( I've had a knife in my pocket for 50 years now, feel naked without it. There was an old swiss army knife in the everything drawer. None of the blades would open unless you grabbed them with a needle nose vise grip. So, I opened everything half way and tossed the knife in dilute phosphoric acid and left it overnight.
this morning it was more than loose. All the blades were floppy and the retaining springs had come out. Don't soak your knife in acid.
Karl
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
That's what I do. I have some pocket knives that date back to the 1930s, and I have polished them that way when they get a little stiff.
I dissolve some Deco stainless polish in paint thinner, pour it into the joints, and work it until it's as loose as I want it. It works very well.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
It took me years to find a Camilus electrican's knife in good condition. I bought my first one when I was 10 and carried one for over 35 years. I probably bought a dozen of them over that time. The spares would disappear out of my toolbox when I turned my back. :(
I finally landed a few at a reasonable price on Ebay last year. :)
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
This guy is my cousin's neighbor.
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Reply to
Tim Wescott
You can fix it. New pins, new springs. Get after it!
Reply to
Wes
And that was a? -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Reply to
Wes
Wes fired this volley in news:lQZor.220337$ snipped-for-privacy@en-nntp-01.dc.easynews.com:
And that was "a" third of the four that MSC originally provided, including the first one that came on the saw, the next one from the three they gifted me for a single replacement, and the second from that same batch. I still have the last of the three replacements in a box, waiting to do another 12-year stint.
The saw cost $199.00
Hmmm... not bad. 12 years, $199... That is $16.58 per year, for a saw I've used no less often than five times a week, every week, since I've owned it.
So... say 250 uses a year... or just a touch over 6-2/3 cents per cutting session (MANY of which are 10-minute cuts).
That's what "a" motor that works right can do!
LLoyd
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh

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