Diy roof repair

The shingles that Andrew Espey put up two years ago are holding up well, but the legal battle that came with them is far from over.
It all started when Espey decided to re-shingle his roof after discovering a leak.
Espey says, "The building inspector came along and told me I couldn't do it. He told me I had to quit and take off the shingles and start over because they have a code."
A Minnesota state residential code says that new asphalt shingles cannot be installed without first removing exist shingles, and on one section of the roof Espey was installing new shingles over the old.
Espey says, "They didn't tell me I couldn't overlay shingles when I got my permit...I didn't even know they had such a code."
The city served him a stop work order, but he ignored it and finished the job.
Espey says, "I was kind of getting disturbed a little bit, somebody telling me what I can do on my home."
Nevertheless, on March of last year he was found guilty of four counts of violating building code and two counts of violating a stop work order, fined over $2000 and sentenced to 90 days in jail, 60 with good behavior.
Espey says, "60 days for working on a house and a drunk can drive down the highway and get a lot less."
Espey did report to the Jackson city law enforcement center to serve his time but was let out after just 17 days as medical precaution.
Espey is claustrophobic and a doctor said staying in jail was making his hypertension worse.
The judge reduced his 73-day balance to 30, to be served on electronic home monitoring or in jail three days at a time.
Espey says, "I said no I don't want them, this isn't what we served in the military for to be tied up in our own home."
Espey is also refusing to pay his fines, maintaining that he did nothing wrong.
Espey says, "I hope they just drop it pretty soon and decide it's enough."
The City attorney declined to comment.
Espy was arrested again last week at a city council meeting where an ordinance was introduced to make violations of the building code a nuisance. He was released after 24 hours.
http://www.keyc.tv/story/15176536/jackson-man-jailed-for-shingling
This must be part of the stimuluss deal. Providing jobs for inspectors, assistant DA's, judges, jail guards, prison vendors etc.
Forget manufacturing, this is the new service ecconomy they talk about in washington.
Best Regards Tom.
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To try and tie this in with federal stimulus is pretty disingenous when you consider this is statute law and in all likelyhood has been in place for going on well before "stimulus" became a household word.
Nice troll though....
--I'll give it a C+
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wrote:

In most burgs, you can't go over -two- layers of asphalt shingles. That town must be trying to make money. Force extra sales for extra sales tax monies?

Wait until they force critical mass of the sheeple...
IICY, or Is It Cull Yet?
-- Worry is a misuse of imagination. -- Dan Zadra
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Two layers is the max allowed here in Shelby County Tn . And I can understand that , shingles are heavy and (especially with newer construction) static loads are an important consideration . Even more important in areas that can/do have heavy snow loads in winter - and that might be what drives that policy in that area .
--
Snag
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As Larry says, two layers apparently is the most common limit. That's what it is here in central NJ, too.
--
Ed Huntress



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On Sat, 06 Aug 2011 06:31:41 -0700, Larry Jaques

Nope - they have a lot of holes they want to turn into toxic wate dumps by filling them with asphault shingles - and they like the revenus that comes from the "tipping fees" charged for disposal.

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wrote:

It varies by county. Jackson County is one where complete tearoffs are required. It has to do with exposure to hail.
http://www.doli.state.mn.us/ccld/PDF/map_hail2.pdf
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They call 1.5 - 5 inch hail stones, moderate size hail. The large ones must be the size of basketballs. Paul K. Dickman
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We get grapefruit size and saucer shaped about the same size when those hand size typhoon land size things come by...
Saucers break bark off trees and you if you are in the way.
They fly sideways coming from tornadoes.
Martin in Texas
On 8/6/2011 4:30 PM, Paul K. Dickman wrote:

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