Drawing Transfer

Hello Everyone,
I am a novice at this, so Please bear with me. I have a project where I have quite a few drawings that I need to transfer to 6"X12"x001" sheet Brass to
be cut.
I have searched Google and found that normally , cutting out the drawing, using spray adhesive, sticking the drawing to the metal, then cutting the metal would work.
The problem is, most of the drawings are different in size and oval type in shape with the line of the oval approximately " wide. I am afraid of damaging the sheet when trying to remove the paper.
I am wondering if someone can suggest an alternate method of transferring the drawings to the sheets. Any and all input will be Greatly Appreciated.
Thank You,
Wayne R. Russ
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Try making a reverse copy in a copier, then using the copy as an iron-on transfer. The toner will transfer well on wood and such, not sure about the brass.
RJ
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"Wayne R. Russ" < snipped-for-privacy@olg.com> wrote in message
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have a look at pulsar.gs for their toner transfer system - better than paper or that mylar foil for iron on stuff. Like a decal, after ironing on, dip in water until the paper slides off. Then you can even etch... / mark (who has tried it)
Backlash wrote:

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I was going to try pulsar.gs transfer system until I went through their online order form.
A $30 purchase, which was 10 sheets of the transfer paper, coming to less than a pound, plus a small roll of the green film for putting on the tonor, came to $45 after shipping and handling. I'm sorry - that's a big ripoff, plain and simple. I send 2 lb items via priority mail for $6, including the packaging. There's no option not to use UPS, and I've had enough stuff damaged or lost by them that I wouldn't want to use them even if it wasn't that high a price. They were very friendly on the phone, but shipping overcharges automatically makes me take my business elsewhere. I will be letting Pulsar know why I will not buy their product.
Press 'n Peel [www.techniks.com], which works well if you can /find/ a decent laser printer to put it through [which is rare, so I have a lot of trouble with parts of the design not transferring], is $30 for 20 sheets, plus $4 S&H. I do enough transfers that I have the items sent out to get silkscreened these days, but Press 'n Peel may be another answer to look at.
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the
Heck, that stuff's thin enough that if you can get it 8.5" initially, just feed it in place of the paper!
Tim
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On material that thin I would try to run it directly t hrough the printer IF the drawings are in the computer. If not try to print on the brass, and it works then scan in the prints if necessary. I'm also assuming an inkjet type printer here, not laser. lg no neat sig line

have
type
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Never tried it with anything this thin but.............
Do the glue-n-cut thing, then soak the cut out part in a pan of Xylene, or similar solvent. After a short while the paper just floats away.
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have
type
If you use rubber cement (artist's type, which you can get in a stationery store), you can dissolve the adhesive with the solvent you buy at the same place. It will hold the paper on well enough and it dissolves away quickly and easily.
Ed Huntress
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Ed Huntress wrote:
<snipped>

Yep, and the solvent is as close as your lawn mower's gas can...
Jeff
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Jeff Wisnia (W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

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The *real* solvent for rubber cement actually is hexane. That's what the thinner is. I suspect that octane would work just fine though! :)
Jim
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jim rozen wrote:

Yeah Jim, but I figgered octane was about 33% better than hexane...<G>
Jeff
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Jeff Wisnia (W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

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Wayne R. Russ wrote:

If it's only .001", tape it to a piece of paper, and run it through a legal size ink jet printer.
Kevin Gallimore
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Wayne R. Russ writes:

Print a mirrored image on a laser printer or photocopier. Place printed side against work. Apply a little acetone or xylene onto a paper towel, and dab the back of the paper. Toner will transfer to the work. A little practice will show how little dabbing is needed. Toner removes off the work later with the same solvents. I also use this for semi-permanent marking.
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On Sun, 22 Feb 2004 16:37:22 -0600, Richard J Kinch

I've tried this before, but I always wind up with a big black smear. I think a lot of it has to do with the type of printer/copier being used. I lightly dampen a cotton ball with xylene and rub it on the back of the paper just enough so that you can see the image through it, then burnish it with a spoon afterwards. If I don't press hard, it doesn't transfer. If I do press, it smears everywhere. I've tried three photocopiers so far. I'll have to try this with some different copy machines and printers again.
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