Electric boatlift project update: it works!

Subject line sez it all.
It's a bit noisy, but no worse that cutting the end out of a 55 gallon steel drum with a Sawz-all. <G> The noise is in the gears
of the Super-Winch ATV winch motor I used as a prime mover. I guess those things are just noisy. Think electric drill or Skilsaw on steroids.
Stealth departure ... not!
I do enjoy pushing the button and seeing that big ol' handwheel do its 30 or 40 turns to raise and lower the boat. That'd be the handwheel for which I used to be the prime mover....
It goes up at about the same speed it goes down and the motor has no perceptible temperature rise after use, so I think it is handling the job with ease. I don't know how much current it's drawing (12 volts) but I'm pretty sure the breakers in the trolling motor circuit are 40 amps and they're holding. That's not much current for a 12 volt winch.
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Ain't it great "when a plan comes together" <G> Ken.
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Don, sounds like a great way to spend retirement time so far.
i
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On Mon, 10 Jul 2006 11:57:16 GMT, Ignoramus19949

The fun part is the fishin', Ig! Now it is easy to go out for just 20 minutes if I want. If they're not bitin', I can come back, do something else for a while and go out again later. Fishin' and not catchin' for more than 30 minutes is boring as hell, but it is really fun when they're about jumpin' in the boat. Haven't had a single fishless day thus far this season, though I never fish for longer than 2 cold beers ... uh, 2 hours.. in one stretch.
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On Mon, 10 Jul 2006 11:23:58 -0500, Don Foreman

Sounds good. I hope that you eat the fish that you catch. I fish with my son and take his friend along, I go to a place with very easy fishing (bluegills) so that they can enjoy it (5 and 4 years old).
i
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On Mon, 10 Jul 2006 20:26:43 GMT, Ignoramus19949

I used to take the neighbor kids fishing..then their mom decided she didnt want the kids playing with explosives.
Shrug
Gunner
The aim of untold millions is to be free to do exactly as they choose and for someone else to pay when things go wrong.
In the past few decades, a peculiar and distinctive psychology has emerged in England. Gone are the civility, sturdy independence, and admirable stoicism that carried the English through the war years . It has been replaced by a constant whine of excuses, complaints, and special pleading. The collapse of the British character has been as swift and complete as the collapse of British power.
Theodore Dalrymple,
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wrote:

Might she have heard that you were fishing in the creek they swim in?
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On Mon, 10 Jul 2006 23:01:16 -0500, Don Foreman

Naw..I never use explosives when people are in the water.
Gunner
The aim of untold millions is to be free to do exactly as they choose and for someone else to pay when things go wrong.
In the past few decades, a peculiar and distinctive psychology has emerged in England. Gone are the civility, sturdy independence, and admirable stoicism that carried the English through the war years . It has been replaced by a constant whine of excuses, complaints, and special pleading. The collapse of the British character has been as swift and complete as the collapse of British power.
Theodore Dalrymple,
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wrote:

Mom may not understand the distinction between boom in creek vs when kids were in creek.
Modern Moms are conditioned to think that life is or should be totally risk-free. A more practical parent would realize that her kid will eventually play with explosives anway if so inclined, so exposure to a mentor who can show them how to do it safely might not be a bad idea.
I'm not making this up. I was such a mentor in high school, at behest of several parents who knew damned well Ron, Bernard, et alia would make bombs and rockets one way or another so they said "OK if you do it with Foreman, otherwise we will hurt you even if your experiments don't."
Fifties approach to parenting. It worked. Nobody ever got hurt.
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On Mon, 10 Jul 2006 20:26:43 GMT, Ignoramus19949

Almost entirely catch -and-release using artifical lures, though I will keep and clean a nice mess of hand-sized panfish on occasion. I'll keep a walleye over 15" and under 3 lb. Don't keep any bass. I fish mostly for bass and do OK at it some days.
I prefer a "run and gun" bass-tournament style of fishing to passive bobber- watching, though I don't fish tournaments. A tourney is 8 hours of intensely competitive hard work rather than an hour or two of fun.
The two styles can be combined. Last week I had two novices (Brits) in the boat to go fishin'. I did run 'n gun for 20 minutes or so to find fish. Go to a "spot", fish it fast for 5 minutes by casting an artifical lure we call "Mary's Magic Lure". I was lookin' for active aggressive fish, not occasional stragglers. No bumps, light up Mr. Johnson and head for the next spot at speed -- fun boatride. My trollin motor's back down and my lure's back in the water as soon as the boat comes off plane. And so on until I get bumps. I found fish in 20 minutes. Set 'em up with rods with bobbers and a bucket of panfish leeches, set bobber stops and they started fishin'. Ya can't beat live bait and bobbers *once on active fish*.
It was hilarious mayhem for the next hour and 15 minutes. I finally had to toss an anchor because I couldn't both manage the boat and help them unhook fish, rebait etc, nevermind fishing myself. One or both of them either had a fish on or was taking one off for the entire period. We'd stringer-sorted while fishing to keep about 15 of the biggest 'gills, had way plenty to feed 4 hungry adults. Hassan wasn't up for the knife 'n guts work so we set up at the end of the dock with him doing the scaling. He did a fine job of it.
My buddy Ted was razzing me, said "Foreman, I didn't think you even owned a knife." "Oh, golly, I do own a couple but I yust don't use 'em much ya know."
You can go fishing or take little kids fishing, not both at the same time. I enjoy both activities. Good for you for taking little kids fishing. You're doing it right -- make it their outing as well as yours, make sure they catch some fish, and don't stay too long.
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On Tue, 11 Jul 2006 00:52:18 -0500, with neither quill nor qualm, Don

Yeah, and they're also conditioned to feel that the gov't should protect them from everything. DAMNED sad, ain't it?

Excellent idea.

Goodonya, Mate.

Ayup. Dad taught me some basic physics (and both Mom and Dad taught me to think for myself) very early on and it helped me get away with a whole lot of...um, interesting and exciting things virtually unscathed.
----------------------------------------------------------------- When I die, I'm leaving my body to science fiction. --Steven Wright ---------------------------- http://diversify.com Comprehensive Website Development
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Not all kids play with explosives. I did not (except for toy explosive ammonium triiodide). And my peers did so, but I declined.
I certainly would not let my son do it, except possibly with me, but I would disapprove.

You were lucky.
I hate to disagree here, but in the universe of interesting and exciting things, explosives are only one little area, that can easily be skipped without much detriment.
i
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On Tue, 11 Jul 2006 17:20:38 GMT, with neither quill nor qualm,

You have entirely missed the point, Ig. The key word was MENTOR. Mentors also have a way of showing kids how NOT to do things before they attempt them so the kids retain all of their appendages.

Yes, but I was prepared for a lot of things before even attempting them, too. Saying "no" to a kid has the opposite effect. They won't be prepared for a lot of things in life. Parents who protect their kids from reality probably attend more funerals than parents who are a bit more open minded. (I wish I had a cite for that. Anyone?) You might want to rethink your approach.

Perhaps, but it sure catches most kids' attention. The largest boomers I played with were M-80s, but I did have that fun experiment producing hydrogen from calcium carbide and water in a rinsed clorox bottle. It scared hell out of Mom but I was laying on my bedroom floor laughing about it. Y'see, when I let go, the 3' flame stopped and went inside the bottle. I had thought it would go out and learned a lesson there. ;)
Anyway, I was referring to "the universe of interesting and exciting things" as you put it, not just explosives.
One last thing is that I hope you will teach your kid (or allow and encourage him) to be curious. It makes all the difference in the world.
----------------------------------------------------------------- When I die, I'm leaving my body to science fiction. --Steven Wright ---------------------------- http://diversify.com Comprehensive Website Development
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On Tue, 11 Jul 2006 00:10:23 -0500, Don Foreman

Sounds very exciting. I love fried fish. Yes, I always try to make sure that they catch some fish, but I do not let them handle hooks.
i
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On Mon, 10 Jul 2006 11:57:16 GMT, Ignoramus19949

Five posts and not a single one includes the original reference. It is nice when people have the common sense to snip non-topic material. It is frustrating when all posters snip everything so the post as no meaning.
It would be nice if one out of the five posters on this topic would have left a bit of information from the original post.
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Does your newsreader allow you to see the "parent" post? I can look up the post for which the current article is a followup, by pressing ESC-p.
i
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wrote:

Using a newsreader like Agent (free) that organizes and displays headers by thread saves a lot of redundancy.
The original post merely stated that I finally got my electric boatlift working.
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On Mon, 10 Jul 2006 23:06:13 -0500, Don Foreman

Also if you press "h" with Agent you get a look at the headers to see what newsreader is being used. I knew that because I have been using Agent since version .56 and have a pretty low registration number for the paid version.

Thanks. I would be interested in some details if possible. I have been considering the same project. My lift has a large wheel which is turned by hand. It does have a brake so the lift stays up. I am considering using a 12 volt winch and taking a few wraps around the windup cylinder on the hand wheel to provide a brake. I would still need to lower the pontoon by hand but that goes pretty fast.
Any comments?
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wrote:

There are some details at http://users.goldengate.net/~dforeman/boatlift /
With most boatlifts the big handwheel is an integral part of the Weston brake. I wanted to retain that brake function for safety, and I wanted to retain the ability to operate the lift by hand if necessary. I modified a 12 volt winch to turn a sprocket rather than a drum, made a spacer to mount another sprocket on the handwheel, and made a mount to attach the motor to the lift housing. Don't have a photo of the finished job because I forgot my camera this trip.
Anyway, the motor drives the handwheel via a bicycle chain, up or down, at about 2 seconds per rev. To disengage, just swing the mount a few degrees to derail the chain off the sprocket so the handwheel can then be operated manually.
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DID YOU PAINT THAT MOTOR???
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