electric motor help

hi, sorry to keep asking for help.
have a floor standing electric fan, found it, freebie on the street, didn't
work (nice fan, practically brand new) took it apart (years ago), found what
i thought was the problem (a small glass electronic thingy (diode or
resistor or some sort) that looked to be "burned out" (at the time i thought
it was a fuse ) de-soldered it, removed it and re-soldered the
wire back where the diode was. when i turned on the fan it ran backwards, i
figured "someday" i'd open it back up again and give it another try (thought
i must've transposed two wires) today i was like "ok, gonna throw it out"
but thought first i'd give it ONE more try. now it's been so long i can't
remember which wire i de-soldered. i THINK it was the wire with the white
fabric covered insulation (in the photo) but can't remember. i don't think
i transposed any of the wires when i de-re-soldered them. wondering if it's
possible for someone to diagnose the problem by only just looking at a
picture.
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oh, and one more thing. this fan has three speeds, when i run it on the
highest speed it STILL seems slow to me, seems as if it is running HALF of
what "3" should be.
(so, it runs backwards and i think at half speed) :-(
cold outside now but i'm sure this coming summer i'm going to be KICKING
myself in the ass for throwing this fan away.
b.w.
Reply to
William Wixon
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I think Your jumper should be from black to gray from the looks of it. The device that failed was prob. a thermal fuse. Jim
Reply to
James R. Freeman
Hey Jim, Thanks! :-) i was so anxious to get this thing FINALLY fixed i absentmindedly desoldered the jumper from the white and put it to grey and when i put it back together i got NOTHING. i was like "DANG!" but opened it back up and realized what i'd done, changed it black to grey, put it back together and it seems to be running fine now. weee!!! i'm sure i'll be thanking you big time this coming summer. thing is, now "1" is the fastest speed (thought "3" was supposed to be fastest). it's running the right direction and it seems it's also running at full speed. i took a picture (with streamer on fan) to show you(ze). i was afraid someone was going to say "you just took a picture when it was windy" so i stuck a pitchfork in the frozen ground behind it w/ a streamer to show it wasn't windy. :-) you said the device i removed was probably a thremal fuse, so, i'm assuming it would be best to not run it unattended now (which i don't do anyhow).
thanks again Jim, you really made my day. practically-brand-new fan rescued from untimely demise.
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b.w.
-snip-
Reply to
William Wixon
Your problem now is that when your motor fills up with lint and starts to overheat, there is no thermal cutout to turn it off before it gets to the point where it starts smouldering and blowing glowing particles along with a forced draft all over your girlfriends bikini or your slumbering body. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller
yeah, just hope that doesn't happen too soon. i usually don't leave a fan running unattended, waste of energy. but, if someone knows of what size/what kind/where i can get one of those tiny glass diode/resistor shaped thermal "fuses" maybe i could solder one back in and won't have to worry about setting my girlfriend's bikini on fire etc.
b.w.
flame bikini...
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Reply to
William Wixon
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Reply to
Ian Malcolm
Hi William,
I don't recall if you said whether or not you still had the old one. They come in different values and you would most likely need the old one to get the proper value. Radio Shack carries some:
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Personally I wouldn't lose any sleep over it. Just don't set it up by a gas can, tissue paper, sheer curtains... We got along pretty well for a good many years without those thermal devices in everything with a bit of common sense. Which seems to be sorely lacking nowadays...
Reply to
Leon Fisk
Last time I needed one, I bought it at the local Radio Shack. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller
The trick is reading the part number on the old piece to get the rating - usually in Degrees Celsius. Or finding the manufacturer to get the right rating. Any decent appliance parts supplier has them.
You can guess, but if you do guess LOW. Better to deal with a nuisance trip than flames.
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
Generally they are 144C units. RatShack thermal fuse # 270-1320, a 144 degree C, $1.49 part
Also available from your local Chrysler dealer. Ask for a Dodge Stratus heater resistor thermal fuse. It'll cost you about 10 times as much as the "shack" part.
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Reply to
clare at snyder.on.ca

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