Fastener advice needed

I'm installing a custom metal gate at my daughter's. It is about 8 feet tall, 40 inches wide and suppose it weighs about 100 lbs.
The post that will hold it is 2" square, 16 gauge well, bolted to the concrete flatwork and braced to the house. It is solid. The hinges need to be attached to the post. Welding at this site is out of the question. Each hinge consists of a thick strap (approx. 1/8" material) "U" shaped with the legs being about 1-1/4 inches wide and 2 inches long. Question: how best to attach. 1) I can drill two clearance holes in the straps and attach with sheet metal screws into the 16 gauge post. Total = 4 screws per hinge. 2) I can drill clearance holes and use self tapping screws into the 16 gauge post. Total 4 screws. 3) I can drill through the post and install two long screws (say #10 or 1/4) with nuts and lock washer on the other end.
The thing I don't like about sheet metal screws is that I never know what size pilot hole to drill. Just guess at the root diameter??? I also tend to over tighten them and they break. Same goes for the self tapping screws. If I break one (I've done it before) I have to abandon it and start a new hole, probably not in the optimum location.
Are the through bolts the best idea?
All comments appreciated.
Thanks, Ivan Vegvary
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Ivan Vegvary wrote:

> Replace the post with one with at least twice the wall thickness. > The hinges need to

> Rehang the gate with welded hinges to a post as above. >

> Recipe for failure. >

> Recipe for failure >

> For a 100lb gate? No.

Through correctly used require the use of tubular spacers to prevent collapsing of the post.

Tom
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I've mounted many gates in my life. I used to make and install them. It sounds like you have made a gate that is too big for the mounting. 2 x 2 will be minimal at best. Your problem is not in the fasteners, but in the material you are fastening to. At minimum you should use 1/4" lags, or similarly strong fasteners. Your fasteners should be able to hold double the weight of the gate, and by hold, I mean hold it up so that the gate bends if someone rides on it before it comes out of the wall.
What happens if a child swings on the gate? They will.
Dolly wheels are worthless unless the concrete is absolutely flat, which it never is. Dolly wheels are okay for long gates where the end points of the swing can be poured in as a support for when the gate is stationary. No driveway or road is level enough for a dolly wheel to be in contact the whole distance. At least none I have seen.
It is difficult to imagine your situation without seeing it.
One solution I have done to situations like this is make a frame around the door, and then mount that frame to the structural members all around.
Good luck.
Steve
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Steve, thanks for your thoughts. I like the 'frame' idea that you state above. I think the post is 16 ga, it could be more, I'm just guessing. It is the standard post that Home Depot sells to support their prefab fake wrought iron fences.
I have the post bolted to the concrete. I have it braced two places to the house. It is 8 feet tall. I weigh 280 pounds and can swing on the post without it budging one bit. I don't think a 100 lb. weight (having about a 160 lb. moment force) will budge this post. I just don't want the hinges to rip away from the post. I suppose I could take my OA torch set to the job and weld on the hinges. Wanted to avoid the hassle (I have the big tanks) but might be the best. Guess I should have bought one of those small 110 volt mig welders instead of the 500 lb one that I have.
Thanks again
Ivan Vegvary
Thanks, Ivan
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The gate and any of your mounting methods will work fine only if you have a load bearing wheel at the bottom outside corner of the gate. If the whole area is concrete, then almost any wheel will work. There are wheels an brackets already made. Check any farm equipment store.
On the question of sheet metal screws, never drill a pilot hole. Punch a hole so the metal pushed aside will engage the threads of the screw.
Good luck.
Paul
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On Jul 9, 12:06 pm, co snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

If you're going with the load bearing wheel, then #12 self drilling/ tapping should work. I agree that 100lbs. mounted to 16ga. is flimsy.
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#3, f'sure. 10-32 would be fine if there were 4, mebbe 1/4-20 if only two. I would add a plate1/8 x 2" by whatever the hinge length is, on the nut-side of the post, to distribute point loads, eliminating any collapse of the tubing wall. Think rustoleum, as well.
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What I would do is to drill and tap and use machine screws. Use a fine thread.
If you have a problem with the screws not getting enough meat you can get riv-nuts in steel that should give you more substance.
One thing that kills hinges is installing them out of line. Use caution when installing them to keep them properly oriented.
Another option is to get a 1/4" bar that you can insert from the top of the post and have this threaded to accept the hinge screws that pass through the holes in the 16 gauge post.
I do not particularly like the through bolt idea as when you snug down on the screws you tend to crush the tube. Sex bolts might do the trick if you want to go this route or perhaps you could accomplish the same thing by using tubing spacers to avoid the crushing of the tube.
Your biggest problem as I see it is that you put up the post first before thinking the problem through.
My preference for gates is to use pivots in preference to hinges and provide some capacity to grease them
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Roger Shoaf

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Roger, thanks for your thoughts. BTW, these are pivots I just did not know what to call them so I called them hinges. They are the pivots you buy for cyclone type fences and gates. I modified the round part (part that goes over the round posts) so they are rectangular and have 2 inch spacing. Just took some heat and hammering.
Thanks, Ivan Vegvary
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